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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 106 106 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 7 7 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 48 BC or search for 48 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
expected, and he gave up the cause of the Republic for lost. See the passages from Cicero's letters quoted in note to The Pardon of Marcellus, sect. 16 (p. 219, l. 4). On account of illness he was not present at the Battle of Pharsalia (Aug. 9, B.C. 48). After the fate of the contest was decided, he refused to continue the struggle or to follow the adherents of the lost cause to Africa, but returned to Italy (September, B.C. 48), to make terms with the conqueror. He remained at Brundisium untiB.C. 48), to make terms with the conqueror. He remained at Brundisium until Caesar's return from Egypt in September, B.C. 47, when he at once sought an interview. Caesar received him with great kindness and respect, and allowed him once more to return to Rome. From this time until the assassination of Caesar in B.C. 44, Cicero remained for the most part in retirement at his Tusculan villa, absorbed in literary pursuits, though in B.C. 46 he delivered his Oration for Marcellus See pp.213 ff., below. (remarkable for its praise of Caesar), and his Defence of Ligarius,
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 7 (search)
imperator: after the news of Pompey's death (B.C. 48) Caesar was made dictator rei publicae constituendae, at the same time receiving certain other special grants of power, and retaining the imperium, which he had now held uninterruptedly for twelve years. Hence the exaggerated expression imperator unus; for in the original sense of this title (see note on p. 252, l. 6) it could be borne by as many officers as was necessary. It was not until the spring of B.C. 45, some months after the delivery of this oration, that Imperator became the title of a new magistrate in whom the imperium was vested for his life, to be transmitted to his descendants. This was the commencement of the Empire, though the office was suspended from the death of Caesar till it was revived by Augustus. From this time the old use of this title was rare. alterum, second. Cicero was imperator by virtue of his provincial government in Cilicia. fascis laureatos: the fasces were wreathed with laurel when the c
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 9 (search)
fuisse, subject of esse. nempe, etc., why! one who, etc. in acie Pharsalica: the decisive victory of Caesar over Pompey, at Pharsalus in Thessaly, was gained August 9, B.C. 48. petebat, aimed at - qui sensus, what were the sentiments, etc.? A rhetorical way of asking him with which party he fought. optabas, pray for (stronger than cupiebas).
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 3 (search)
s troops enemies: this Cicero objects to. vero, forsooth, marks the irony. civium: if not hostes, they were, of course, cives, whom it would be impious to kill. improbis (sc. civibus), criminals. inquit: the mover of the proposition which Cicero is combating is supposed to retort that, though citizens, these are criminals, and that Cicero's sarcasm therefore misses fire. clarissimus vir: P. Servilius Vatia, the proposer of the supplicatio, Caesar's colleague in his second consulship, B.C. 48. quae, etc.: i.e. these words are appropriate not to soldiers in arms against the state but to civil offenders. bellum, etc.: this is Cicero's statement of the real facts as opposed to his ironical suggestion in the preceding sentence. infert, used of offensive war. quattuor consulibus, i.e. besides the consuls, the two consuls elect, Plancus and D. Brutus. unus, i.e. Antony. gent, is actually carrying on. suis cladibus, the evils he himself threatens. Dolabellae facinus: Dolab