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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 106 106 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero. You can also browse the collection for 48 BC or search for 48 BC in all documents.

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Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Public Life and Contemporary Politics. (search)
tending the canvass (§ 2 i). His successor in the provinces would not naturally begin his term of office until Jan. 1, 48 B.C., and in accordance with the regular practice in such cases, Caesar might count upon holding his provinces until that tim, had restored order at Rome, had defeated the Pompeian lieutenants, Afranius, Petreius, and Varro, in Spain; and in Jan., 48 B.C., he crossed the Adriatic and began the offensive operations against Pompey which ended in the victory near Pharsalus, Aug. 9, 48 B.C. Pompey fled, but was murdered about three weeks later, while landing at Pelusium in Egypt. Caes. B. C. 3.104. Cicero had been coldly received by the Pompeians at Dyrrachium, Att. 11.6.6. and had little to do with the preparation Att. 11. 5.4. and Patrae, Fam. 13.17.1. and then decided to return to Italy. He reached Brundisium Fam. 14.12. in Oct., 48 B.C., and stayed there until Sept, 47 B.C., passing one of the most miserable years of his life. He was distressed by bot
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXXI: ad familiares 8.1 (search)
with Catiline, but took no active part in the conspiracy. In 52 B.C. as tribune he vigorously supported the aristocratic cause, but in later life he went over to Caesar. In 51 B.C. , when his letters to Cicero begin, Caelius was a candidate for the curule aedileship. In January, 49, he opposed the senate, and fled with Curio to Caesar's camp. Disappointed with the 'spoils' which fell to his share, he joined Milo in an uprising in southern Italy, and was put to death by Caesar's troops in 48 B.C. In the social world his intimacy with Clodia (Ep. VIII.5) gave him great notoriety. The wit and beauty of Caelius attracted this Palatine Medea, and the banquets and revels at Rome and Baiae, in which Caelius and Clodia were the central figures, were the talk of Rome. At last they quarrelled, and many of the difficulties in which Caelius was subsequently involved could be traced directly to her, in one of which, a charge of murder, Cicero delivered in his defense the Or. pro Caelio. It wa
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LII: ad familiares 9.9 (search)
Letter LII: ad familiares 9.9 Caesar's camp near Dyrrachium, June, 48 B.C. For Dolabella, see Intr. 56. For Cicero's movements after writing Ep. LI., cf. Intr. 31. Dolabella was in Caesar's camp, and Cicero was probably in Pompey's. S. v. g. v.: for si vales, gaudeo. Valeo. Literary Latin failed to perpetuate gaudeo in its archaic sense, which crops out here and there in colloquial Latin. In Plautus it is regularly used in welcoming a friend on his return from foreign parts; cf., e.g., Trin. 1097 et salve et salvom te advenisse gaudeo. It is quite natural that Dolabella in his free and easy style should write s. v. g. instead of the common formula s. v. b. e. Cf. also Intr. 62. recte : regularly used in inquiries and answers concerning one's health. Cf., e.g., satine recte (valetis)? Ter. And. 804; nempe recte valet? Plaut. Bacch. 188; DEM. quid agitur? SY. recte (agitur), Ter. Adel. 884. minus belle (sc. se) habuit: on belle, see bellus, Ep. XXIV.2n. The omission of se in
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LIII: ad familiares 14.12 (search)
Letter LIII: ad familiares 14.12 Brundisium, Nov. 4, 48 B.C. With reference to the battle of Pharsalus and Cicero's subsequent movements, cf. Intr. 31-32. iniuriis: sc. at the hands of the Pompeians, who were angry at his refusal to take charge of their forces after the defeat at Pharsalus. metuo: on the one hand, Caesar had forbidden the Pompeians to return to Italy, so that the ultimate triumph of the Caesarians would be fraught with danger to Cicero; on the other hand, in view of their anger at him, the success of the Pompeians would be equally dangerous. in viam nihil est: Terentia had expressed a wish to join him at Brundisium, and the coolness with which Cicero receives the proposal is another indication of the estrangement between husband and wife. d. pr.: cf. Intr. 62 (end).
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LIV: ad familiares 14.19 (search)
Letter LIV: ad familiares 14.19 Brundisium, Nov.27, 48 B.C. in maximis doloribus: cf. Intr. 32. quod accedere: Atticus had given the same advice (Att. 11.5.2), but Cicero had hesitated to adopt it, for fear of injury at the hands of the Caesarians. multa, etc. : e.g. his lictors; see Att. 11.6.2. Pomponio: cf. Intr. 58.
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LV: ad familiares 14.17 (search)
Letter LV: ad familiares 14.17 Brundisium, Dec. 18, 48 B.C. s. v. b. e. v.: cf. Intr. 62 and Ep. LVI. n. Lepta: cf. Ep. XXXV. 22. Trebatio: see Ep. XXI. introd. note. Lepta and Trebatius had met Cicero at Brundisium. Cicero's state of mind is more fully indicated in a letter written to Atticus (Att. 11.8) at this time.
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXXI: ad familiares 13.72 (search)
Letter LXXI: ad familiares 13.72 Rome (?), 46 B.C. P. Servilius Vatia Isauricus (the younger man of that name), to whom Cicero addressed Fam. 13.66-72, was in 46 B.C. proconsul of Asia. He had been praetor in 54 B.C. , and consul in 48 B.C. , and was an active and influential member of the party of the Optimates. He apparently belonged to the extreme wing of that party, as he is classed by Cicero with Bibulus, Curio, and Favonius (Ep. XVI. 2). He was Cicero's colleague in the college of augurs. Caerelliae: a woman, probably about Cicero's own age, of whom we hear little up to the last few years of Cicero's life, when an intimate friendship sprung up between them. In Att. 13.21.5. Cicero calls the attention of Atticus to the fact that Caerellia succeeded in getting a copy of the de Finibus from the copyists of Atticus before the book was published. She attempted as a common friend to bring about a reconciliation between Cicero and Publilia (cf. Att. 14.19.4; Att. 15.1.4). Of Cic
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXXXIV: ad familiares 13.50 (search)
Letter LXXXIV: ad familiares 13.50 Rome, about Jan. 1, 44 B.C. Acilius, to whom Fam. 13.30-39 also were addressed, had been twice successfully defended by Cicero (Fam. 7.30.3). He had just been sent out to Achaia to succeed Servius Sulpicius Rufus (cf. Fam. 7.29.1; 7.30.3). For M'. Curius, in whose behalf the letter was written, see Ep. XXXIX. 2. Cicero felt a debt of gratitude to him, because of the hospitality which he had shown him at Patrae, after the battle of Pharsalus (cf. Fam. 13.17.1). The letter was written in response to a request from Curius (cf. Fam. 7.29.1, 7.30.3). Brundisi: from Oct., 48 B.C. , to Sept., 47; cf. Intr. 32 f. familiaris: cf. Fam. 13.17.1. sartum et tectum: an adaptation of the technical phrase sarta et tecta, used by the censors of buildings placed in the hands of contractors to be put into perfect repair, so as to be secure against the assaults of wind and weather. Cf. Blix on Plaut. Trin. 317, and Otto, Sprichwörter, 309.