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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 73 73 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 9 9 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 6 6 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 2 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 2 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for 480 BC or search for 480 BC in all documents.

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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
the flute that he presumed to challenge Apollo, god of music and master of the lyre. The myth appears to be a record of the supersession of the flute by the lyre in Greek favour. after having defeated him in a contest of musical skill; he hung up his skin in the cave from which the sources issue, and it is for this reason that the river is called Marsyas. It was here also, report has it, that Xerxes, when he was on his retreat from Greece after losing the famous battle,viz. of Salamis, in 480 B.C. built the palace just mentioned and likewise the citadel of Celaenae. Here Cyrus remained thirty days; and Clearchus, the Lacedaemonian exile, arrived, with a thousand hoplites, eight hundred Thracian peltasts, and two hundred Cretan bowmen. At the same time came also Sosis the Syracusan with three hundred hoplites and Agias the Arcadian with a thousand hoplites. And here Cyrus held a review and made an enumeration of the Greeks in the park, and they amounted all told to eleven thousand
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 3, chapter 2 (search)
dess, they were unable to find goats enough;According to Herodotus (Hdt. 6.117) the Persian dead numbered 6,400. so they resolved to offer five hundred every year, and this sacrifice they are paying even to this day. Again, when Xerxes at a later time gathered together that countlessHerodotus (Hdt. 7.185) puts the whole number of fighting men in Xerxes' armament at 2,641,610. host and came against Greece, then too our forefathers were victorious, both by land and by sea,By sea at Salamis (480 B.C.) and by land at Plataea (479 B.C.). over the forefathers of our enemies. As tokens of these victories we may, indeed, still behold the trophies, but the strongest witness to them is the freedom of the states in which you were born and bred; for to no human creature do you pay homage as master, but to the gods alone. It is from such ancestors, then, that you are sprung.“Now I am far from intending to say that you disgrace them; in fact, not many days ago you set yourselves in array agains