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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 73 73 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 9 9 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 6 6 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 3 3 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 2 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 2 2 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 480 BC or search for 480 BC in all documents.

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Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK IV. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 18. (11.)—THRACE; THE ÆGEAN SEA. (search)
e alreadyB. ii. c. 92. The present Straits of Gallipoli. stated, Europe from Asia, by a channel seven stadia in width, has four cities facing each other, CallipolisNow Gallipoli, a place of considerable commercial importance. and SestosNow Ialova; famous in Grecian poetry, with Abydos, for the loves of Hero and Leander. in Europe, and LampsacusNow Lamsaki. and AbydosThe village of Aidos, or Avido, probably marks its site. To the north, Xerxes passed over to Sestos on his bridge of boats, B.C. 480. in Asia. On the Chersonesus, there is the promontory of MastusiaNow Capo Helles., lying opposite to SigeumNow Jeni-Hisari, the N.W. promontory of Troas. Here Homer places the Grecian camp during the Trojan war.; upon one side of it stands the CynossemaMeaning the "Bitch's tomb," the fable being that Hecuba, in her old age, was changed into that animal. It was near the town of Madytus. (for so the tomb of Hecuba is called), the naval stationMeaning that their fleet was anchored off here durin
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK IV. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 20.—CRETE. (search)
the Platiæ, the Sirnides, Naulochos, Armedon, and Zephyre. Belonging to Hellas, but still in the Ægean Sea, we have the LichadesBetween Eubœa and Locris. They are now called Ponticonesi., consisting of Scarphia, Coresa, Phocaria, and many others which face Attica, but have no towns upon them, and are consequently of little note. Opposite Eleusis, however, is the far-famed SalamisNow Koluri. It is memorable for the naval battle fought off its coast, when Xerxes was defeated by the Greeks, B.C. 480.; before it, PsyttaliaNow called Lypsokutali.; and, at a distance of five miles from Sunium, the island of HeleneNow Makronisi, or "the Long Island." Its ancient name was also Macris. Strabo identifies it with the Homeric Cranaë, to which Paris fled with Helen.. At the same distance from this last is CeosUsually called Cea, one of the Cyclades, about thirteen miles S.E. of Sunium. Its modern name is Zea. Iulis was the most important town, and the birth-place of the poets Simonides and Bacchyl
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK IV. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 21.—EUBŒA. (search)
y was founded at this place by Menedemus, a disciple of Plato., CarystusNow Karysto, on the south of the island, at the foot of Mount Ocha, upon which are supposed to have been its quarries of marble. There are but few remains of the ancient city. The historian Antigonus, the comic poet Apollodorus, and the physician Diocles, were natives of this place., Oritanum, and ArtemisiumProbably on the promontory of the same name. It was off this coast that the Greek fleet engaged that of Xerxes, B.C. 480.. Here are also the Fountain of ArethusaThere were tame fish kept in this fountain; and its waters were sometimes disturbed by volcanic agency. Leake says that it has now totally disappeared., the river Lelantus, and the warm springs known as Ellopiæ; it is still better known, however, for the marble of Carystus. This island used formerly to be called Chalcodontis and MacrisFrom the fact of its producing copper, and of its being in shape long and narrow., as we learn from Dionysius and Ephoru
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK V. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 1.—THE TWO MAURITANIAS. (search)
same name. Some writers call him king, and others dux, or imperator of the Carthaginians; from which we may infer, that he held the office of suffetes. This expedition has by some been placed as far back as the time of the Trojan war, or of Hesiod, while others again place it as late as the reign of Agathocles. Falconer, Bougainville, and Gail, place the time of Hanno at about B.C. 570, while other critics identify him with Hanno, the father or son of Hamilcar, who was killed at Himera, B.C. 480. Pliny often makes mention of him; more particularly see B. viii. c. 21., a Carthaginian general, who was commanded, in the most flourishing times of the Punic state, to explore the sea-coast of Africa. The greater part of the Greek and Roman writers have followed him, and have related, among other fabulous stories, that many cities there were founded by him, of which no remembrance, nor yet the slightest vestige, now exists. While Scipio Æmilianus held the command in Sicily, Polybius the his
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK V. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 44.—THE ISLANDS OF THE PROPONTIS. (search)
iii. of Lampsacus, DiodorusSee end of B. iii. of Syracuse, HannoThe author of the Periplus, or voyage which he performed round a part of Libya, of which we have a Greek translation from the Punic original. His age is not known, but Pliny states (B. ii. c. 67, and B. v. c. 1) that the voyage was undertaken in the most flourishing days of Carthage. It has been considered on the whole, that he may be probably identified with Hanno, the son or the father of Hamilcar, who was slain at Himera, B.C. 480., HimilcoMentioned also by Pliny, B. ii. c. 67, as having conducted a voyage of discovery from Gades towards the north, along the western shores of Europe, at the same time that Hanno proceeded on his voyage along the western coast of Africa. He is repeatedly quoted by Festus Avienus, in his geographical poem called Ora Maritima. His voyage is said to have lasted four months, but it is impossible to judge how far it extended., NymphodorusSee end of B. iii., CalliphanesSee end of B. iii., Arte
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK XXXVII. THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PRECIOUS STONES., CHAP. 77.—A COMPARATIVE VIEW OF NATURE AS SHE APPEARS IN DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. THE COMPARATIVE VALUES OF THINGS. (search)
QUOTED.—King Juba,See end of B. v. XenocratesSee end of B. xxxiii. the son of Zeno, Sudines,See end of B. xxxvi. Æschylus,See end of B. x. Philoxenus,A Dithyrambic poet, a native of Cythera. or, according to some, of Heraclea in Pontus. During the latter part of his life he resided at the court of the younger Dionysius, tyrant of Sicily, and died B.C. 380, at the age of 55. Of his poems, only a few fragments are left. Euripides,One of the great Tragic Poets of Greece, born at Salamis B.C. 480. Of his Tragedies, eighteen are still extant, out of seventy-five, or, according to some accounts, ninety-two, which he originally wrote. Nicander,See end of B. viii. Satyrus,Nothing positive seems to be known of this author, who is mentioned in Chapters 11, 24, and 25 of the present Book as having written on Precious Stones. It is possible that he may have been the architect mentioned in B. xxxvi. c. 14. Hardouin would identify him with a Comic writer of Olynthus, of this name. Theophrastus,