hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 83 83 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 51 BC or search for 51 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
ius led to the appointment of Pompey as consul without colleague See p. 170, below. (practically dictator), in B.C. 52. One of his acts was to pass a law postponing the provincial administration of consuls and praetors until five years after their year of office. The interval was to be filled by such former magistrates as had never held a province. Among these was Cicero, who therefore had to submit to the lot. He drew Cilicia, in which an inroad of the Parthians was expected. About May I, B.C. 51, he set out for this province. His administration was in accord with the principles expressed in his writings,—clean and honest,—a thing worthy of notice in an age of corruption and greed. He had the good fortune to escape the test of a formidable war, but he was successful in overcoming some tribes of plundering mountaineers. For this he was hailed as imperator, according to custom, and he even hoped for the honor of a triumph, the highest conventional distinction which a Roman could obtai
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 8 (search)
hose wishes you see clearly by their silence? The Latin idiom is quite different: why do you wait for the expressed opinion (auctoritatem) of [those] speaking whose wishes you see [when] silent? huic, this.. . here: the demonstrative pronouns are often thus employed in the so-called deictic use, accompanied by a gesture. Sestio: a member of the aristocratic party whom Cicero afterwards defended in one of his greatest orations. M. Marcello: a prominent member of the aristocracy, consul B.C. 51; not to be confounded with the person of the same name mentioned in sect. 19. He took a leading part in the Civil War against Caesar, and was afterwards defended by Cicero (see p.213)-jam, by this time. consuli, consul as I ant. in templo, i.e. notwithstanding the sacredness of the place. vim et manus (hendiadys), violent hands. cum quiescunt, i.e. by keeping quiet: § 549, a (326, a); G. 582; H. 599(517,2); H-B. 551. videlicet cara, alluding to his demand to have the matter submit