hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 1 1 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 7 results in 7 document sections:

Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics, Book 2, section 1223b (search)
n will do the same action voluntarily and involuntarily at the same time.The same argument applies also in the case of passion;for there appear to be control and lack of control of passion as well as of desire and what is contrary to passion is painful and restraint is a matter of force, so that if what is forced is involuntary, what is in accordance with passion will always be voluntary. Even HeracleitusThe natural philosopher of Ephesus, fl. c. 513 B.C. His sentence ended O(/ TI GA\R A)\N XRH/|ZH| GI/NESQAI, YUXH=S W)NEI=TAI, Iamblichus, Protrepticus, p. 140. seems to have in view the strength of passion when he remarks that the checking of passion is painful; for 'It is difficult (he says) to do battle with passion, for it buys its wish at the price of life.' And if it is impossible to do the same act voluntarily and involuntarily at the same time and in respect of the same part of the act,
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1315a (search)
of a ruler the most formidable and those against whom the greatest precaution is needed are those that are ready to sacrifice their lives if they can destroy him. Hence the greatest care must be taken to guard against those who think that insolent outrage is being done either to themselves or to those who happen to be under their care; for men attacking under the influence of anger are reckless of themselves, as HeraclitusThe natural philosopher of Ephesus, fl. circa 513 B.C., known as o( skoteino/s for his epigrammatic obscurity. also observed when he said that anger was hard to combat because it would buy revenge with a life. And since states consist of two parts, the poor people and the rich, the most important thing is for both to think that they owe their safety to the government and for it to prevent either from being wronged by the other, but whichever class is the stronger, this must be made to be entirely on the side of
acked Samos under the pretext of restoring SYLOSON, but his further designs in that quarter were interrupted by the revolt of the Babylonians, who had profited by the period of confusion which followed the death of Cambyses to make every preparation for rebellion. After a siege of twenty months, Babylon was taken by a stratagem of ZOPYRUS, and was severely punished for its revolt, probably about B. C. 516. The reduction of Babylon was soon followed by Dareius's invasion of Scythia (about B. C. 513, or 508 according to Wesseling and Clinton). The cause of this expedition is very obscure. Herodotus (4.1, 83) attributes it to the desire of Dareius to take vengeance on the Scythians for their invasion of Media in the time of CYAXARES,--far too remote a cause, though very probably used as a pretext. Ctesias says, that on the occasion of a predatory incursion into Scythia by the satrap of Cappadocia, the Scythian king had sent a letter of defiance to Dareius, and that this provoked him to
elled by the sickness consequent on such meagre diet to return to Ephesus, where he died. As to the manner of his death, various absurd stories are related. His age at the time of his death is said, on Aristoale's authority, to have been sixty (D. L. 9.3, compared with 8.52), and he flourished about the 69th Olympiad (Ib. 9.1), being later than Pythagoras, Xenophanes, and Hecattaeus, whom he mentions. With this date Suidas agrees, and hence Chnton (F. H. vel. ii ) places him under the year B. C. 513. Works On Nature (peri\ fu/sews) The philosophical system of Heracleitus was contained in a work which received various titles from the ancients, of which the most common is On Nature (peri\ fu/sews). From the obscurity of his style, Heracleitus gained the title of skoteino/s, and, with his predilection for this method of writing, was probably connected his aristocratical pride and hauteur (whence he was called o)xloloi/doros), his tenacious adherence to his own views, which, accor
Histiaeus (*(Istiai=os), tyrant of Miletus, commanded his contingent of Ionians in the service of Dareius in the invasion of Scythia by the Persians (B. C. 513), when he was left with his countrymen to guard the bridge of boats by which the army had crossed the Danube. Sixty days had been assigned by the Persian king as the period of his absence, marked by as many knots tied in a rope, one of which was to be untied daily. When the time had passed, and the Persians did not appear, being still engaged in a vain pursuit of the Scythians, the Ionians took counsel about their return. The proposal of Miltiades, the Athenian, to destroy the bridge, and leave the Persians to their fate, would have occasioned the certain destruction of Dareius and his army, had not Histiaeus persuaded his countrymen, the rulers of the Greek cities on the Hellespont and in Ionia, not to take a step which would lead to their own ruin, depending as they did upon the Persians for support against the democratic p
rom. i. p. 309) reckoned 312 years from the h/liki/a of Pythagoras to B. C. 270. This would place the date of his birth at the close of the seventh century B. C. (B. C. 608.) Nearly the same date results from the account of Eratosthenes (ap. D. L. 8.47), and this is the date adopted by Bentley among others. On the other hand, according to Aristoxenus (Porph. l.c. 100.9), Pythagoras quitted Samos in the reign of Polycrates, at the age of 40. According to Iamblichus he was 57 years of age in B. C. 513. This would give B. C. 570 as the date of his birth, and this date coincides better with other statements. All authorities agree that he flourished in the times of Polycrates and Tarquinius Superbus (B. C. 540-510. See Clinton, Fasti Hellen. s. a. B. C. 539, 533, 531, 510). The war between Sybaris and Crotona might furnish some data bearing upon the point, if the connection of Pythagoras with it were matter of certainty. It was natural that men should be eager to know, or ready to conjec
rom. i. p. 309) reckoned 312 years from the h/liki/a of Pythagoras to B. C. 270. This would place the date of his birth at the close of the seventh century B. C. (B. C. 608.) Nearly the same date results from the account of Eratosthenes (ap. D. L. 8.47), and this is the date adopted by Bentley among others. On the other hand, according to Aristoxenus (Porph. l.c. 100.9), Pythagoras quitted Samos in the reign of Polycrates, at the age of 40. According to Iamblichus he was 57 years of age in B. C. 513. This would give B. C. 570 as the date of his birth, and this date coincides better with other statements. All authorities agree that he flourished in the times of Polycrates and Tarquinius Superbus (B. C. 540-510. See Clinton, Fasti Hellen. s. a. B. C. 539, 533, 531, 510). The war between Sybaris and Crotona might furnish some data bearing upon the point, if the connection of Pythagoras with it were matter of certainty. It was natural that men should be eager to know, or ready to conjec