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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 82 82 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 8 8 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 1-2 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War. You can also browse the collection for 52 BC or search for 52 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War, The Campaigns in Gaul. (search)
Book V. B. C. 54. The partial conquest of Britain (second invasion) is followed by various movements in Northern Gaul, in which the desperate condition of the Roman garrisons is relieved after serious losses by the prudent and brave conduct of Labienus and Quintus Cicero. Book VI. B. C. 53. Caesar makes a second brief expedition across the Rhine against the Germans. Some general disturbances are quelled, and Northern Gaul is reduced to peace. Book VII. B. C. 52. Vercingetorix, a brave and high-spirited chief of Southern Gaul, effects a confederacy of the whole country, which is at length subdued. Vercingetorix surrenders himself to secure the quiet of the country, and is taken in chains to Rome, where he was afterwards put to death at Caesar's triumph. Book VIII. B. C. 51. Slight insurrections breaking out here and there are easily subdued; and by the capture of the last native stronghold, Uxellodunum, the subjugation of Gaul i