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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 61 61 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to and from Quintus (ed. L. C. Purser) 2 2 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War. You can also browse the collection for 55 BC or search for 55 BC in all documents.

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C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 4, chapter 1 (search)
The following winter (this was the year in which Cn. Pompey and M. Crassus were consuls [55 B.C.]), those Germans [called] the Usipetes, and likewise the Tenchtheri, with a great number of men, crossed the Rhine , not far from the place at which that river discharges itself into the sea. The motive for crossing [that river] was, that having been for several years harassed by the Suevi, they were constantly engaged in war, and hindered from the pursuits of agriculture. The nation of the Suevi is by far the largest and the most warlike nation of all the Germans. They are said to possess a hundred cantons, from each of which they yearly send from their territories for the purpose of war a thousand armed men: the others who remain at home, maintain [both] themselve
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War, Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
ting for many reasons a greater commotion in Gaul, resolves to hold a levy by the means of M. Silanus C. Antistius Reginus, and T. Sextius, his lieutenants: at the same time he requested Cn. Pompey, the proconsul, that since he was remaining near the city invested with military command for the interests of the commonwealth, he would command those men whom when consul [55 B.C.] he had levied by the military oath in Cisalpine Gaul, to join their respective corps, and to proceed to him; thinking it of great importance, as far as regarded the opinion which the Gauls would entertain for the future, that that the resources of Italy should appear so great that if any loss should be sustained in war, not only could it be repaired in a short time, but