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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 61 61 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 8 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to and from Quintus (ed. L. C. Purser) 2 2 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 55 BC or search for 55 BC in all documents.

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Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VII. We here enter upon the third division of Pliny's Natural History, which treats of Zoology, from the 7th to the 11th inclusive. Cuvier has illustrated this part by many valuable notes, which originally appeared in Lemaire's Bibliotheque Classique, 1827, and were afterwards incorporated, with some additions, by Ajasson, in his translation of Pliny, published in 1829; Ajasson is the editor of this portion of Pliny's Natural History, in Lemaire's Edition.—B. MAN, HIS BIRTH, HIS ORGANIZATION, AND THE INVENTION OF THE ARTS., CHAP. 3.—MARVELLOUS BIRTHS. (search)
ites were thrown into the sea.—B. but at the present day they are employed for sensual purposes.Cuvier says, "From time to time we do see persons of this nature; and it is not long ago that such a being was exhibited in Paris, though certainly not of a nature to have been ' in deliciis,' at the present day." Pompeius Magnus, among the decorations of his theatre,Pliny gives further particulars of this theatre in B. xxxvi. c. 24. It was the first stone theatre erected at Rome, and was built B.C. 55, and contained 40,000 spectators. erected certain statues of remarkable persons, which had been executed with the greatest care by artists of the very highest reputation. Among others, we here read an inscription to the following effect: "Eutychis,Solinus, the ape of Pliny, absolutely takes the meaning of this passage to be, that Eutychis herself was exhibited on the stage by the orders of Pompey. of Tralles,For Tralles, in Asia Minor, see B. v. c. 29. was borne to the funeral pile by twent
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VII. We here enter upon the third division of Pliny's Natural History, which treats of Zoology, from the 7th to the 11th inclusive. Cuvier has illustrated this part by many valuable notes, which originally appeared in Lemaire's Bibliotheque Classique, 1827, and were afterwards incorporated, with some additions, by Ajasson, in his translation of Pliny, published in 1829; Ajasson is the editor of this portion of Pliny's Natural History, in Lemaire's Edition.—B. MAN, HIS BIRTH, HIS ORGANIZATION, AND THE INVENTION OF THE ARTS., CHAP. 44.—REMARKABLE EXAMPLES OF HONOURS. (search)
mmon soldier. of the common soldier. Balbus Cornelius, also, the elder, was elected to the consulate;In the year A.U.C. 704. but he had previously been accused, and the judges had been charged to discuss the point whether he could or not lawfully be scourged with rods; he being the first foreigner,He was a native of Gades, in Spain. A party of the Roman nobles induced an inhabitant of Gades to accuse him of having illegally assumed the privileges of a Roman citizen. The cause was tried B.C. 55, and he was supported by Pompey and Crassus, and defended by Cicero. One of the tests of the being a Roman citizen, was the immunity from being scourged, according to the provisions of the Porcian law. So St. Paul, who, as a citizen of Tarsus, enjoyed the rights of a Roman citizen, says to the centurion, Acts xxii. 25, "Is it lawful for you to scourge a man that is a Roman, and uncondemned?"—born even on the very shores of the ocean,—who obtained that honour, which our ancestors denied even to
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VIII. THE NATURE OF THE TERRESTRIAL ANIMALS., CHAP. 7. (7.)—THE COMBATS OF ELEPHANTS. (search)
Circus for the first time during the curule ædileship of Claudius Pulcher, in the consulship of M. Antonius and A. Postumius, in the year of the City 655; and that twenty years afterwards, during the curule ædileship of the Luculli, they were set to fight against bulls. In the second consulshipA.U.C. 678.—B. of Pompeius, at the dedication of the temple of Venus Victrix,"Venus the Conqueror." This temple was dedicated by Pompey, after his conquests in the East, in his second consulship, B.C. 55. twenty elephants, or, as some say, seventeen, fought in the Circus against a number of Gætulians, who attacked them with javelins. One of these animals fought in a most astonishing manner; being pierced through the feet, it dragged itself on its knees towards the troop, and seizing their bucklers, tossed them aloft into the air: and as they came to the ground they greatly amused the spectators, for they whirled round and round in the air, just as if they had been thrown up with a certain degr