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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 8 8 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 1 1 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 1 1 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone 1 1 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Fragments of Book 10, Chapter 13 (search)
Cyrus, the king of the Persians, after he had reduced the land of the Babylonians and the Medes,550 B.C. was encompassing in his hopes all the inhabited world. For now that he had subdued these powerful and great nations he thought that there was no king or people which could withstand his might; since of those who are possessed of irresponsible power, some are wont not to bear their good fortune as human beings should.Const. Exc. 4, p. 296.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Laconia, chapter 18 (search)
wo tripods themselves and the reliefs are the work of Gitiadasc. 500 B.C.. The third was made by Gallon of Aegina, and under it stands an image of the Maid, daughter of Demeter. Aristander of Paros and Polycleitus of Argosc. 440 B.C. have statues here; the former a woman with a lyre, supposed to be Sparta, the latter an Aphrodite called “beside the Amyclaean.” These tripods are larger than the others, and were dedicated from the spoils of the victory at Aegospotami. Bathycles of Magnesia,c. 550 B.C. who made the throne of the Amyclaean, dedicated, on the completion of the throne, Graces and an image of Artemis Leucophryene. Whose pupil this Bathycles was, and who was king of Lacedaemon when he made the throne, I pass over; but I saw the throne and will describe its details. It is supported in front, and similarly behind, by two Graces and two Seasons. On the left stand Echidna and Typhos, on the right Tritons. To describe the reliefs one by one in detail would have merely bored my read
Plato, Laws, Book 1, section 630a (search)
CliniasOf course.AthenianYet, brave though these men are, we still maintain that they are far surpassed in bravery by those who are conspicuously brave in the greatest of wars; and we also have a poet for witness,—Theognis (a citizen of Sicilian Megara), who says: In the day of grievous feud, O Cyrnus, the loyal warrior is worth his weight in silver and gold.Theognis 5.77-8 BergkHe wrote sententious poetry about 550 B.C. Such a man, in a war much more grievous, is, we say, ever so much better than the other—nearly as much better, in fact, as the union of justice, prudence and wis
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK V. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 11.—THE CITIES OF EGYPT. (search)
, on the east side of the Canopic branch of the Nile. It was the ancient capital of Lower Egypt and contained the palace and burial-place of the Pharaohs. It was the chief seat of the worship of the Egyptian goddess Neith, also known as Sais. It gave its name to the nome of Saïtes., and NaucratisIt was situate in the Delta of Egypt and in the nome of Saïtes, on the eastern bank of the Canopic branch of the Nile. It was a colony of the Milesians, founded probably in the reign of Amasis, about B.C. 550, and remained a pure Greek city. It was the only place in Egypt in which, in the time of the later Pharaohs, foreigners were permitted to settle and trade. In later times it was famous for the worship of Aphrodite or Venus, and rivalled Canopus in the dissoluteness of its manners., from which last some writers call that the Naucratitic Mouth, which is by others called the Heracleotic, and mention it insteadPtolemy the geographer does this. of the Canopic Mouth, which is the next to it.
Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Antigone, commLine 1168 (search)
plou/tei … zh=, the hypothetical imperat.: Antiphon fr. 130 (ap. Flor. 68. 37) fe/re dh\ kai\ pai=des gene/sqwsan: fronti/dwn h)/dh pa/nta ple/a. Dem. or. 20 § 14 ou)de\ ga\r ei) pa/nu xrhsto/s e)sq', w(s e)mou= g' e(/neka e)/stw, belti/wn e)sti\ th=s po/lews to\ h)=qos. ei) bou/lei: Plat. Rep. 432A tou\s i)sxurota/tous kai\ tou\s me/sous, ei) me\n bou/lei, fronh/sei, ei) de\ bou/lei, i)sxu/i+. For the form zh=, cp. Eur. I. T. 699 a)ll' e(/rpe kai\ zh= kai\ do/mous oi)/kei patro/s. But Anthol. P. 11. 57 pi=ne, ge/ron, kai\ zh=qi (by Agathias, c. 550 A.D.): and so ib. 10. 43 (author uncertain). sxh=ma, outward show, dignity, pomp: Plat. Legg. 685C to\ th=s a)rxh=s sxh=ma...ou) smikro/
the region of Marmarica. He met his end at last by treachery, being strangled by his brother or friend, Learchus. His wife, Eryxo, however, soon after avenged his death by the murder of his assassin. His reign lasted, according to some, from 560 to 550 B. C.; according to others, from 554 to 544. (Hdt. 4.160; Diod. Exc. de Virt. et Vit. p. 232; Plut. de Virt. Mul. pp. 260, 261; Thrige, §§ 35, 37.) Ba'ttus Iii. 5. BATTUS III., or "the lame" (*Xwlo/s), son of Arcesilaus JI., reigned from B. C. 550 to 530, or, as some state it, from 544 to 529. In his time, the Cyrenaeans, weakened by internal seditions, apprehensive of assaults from Libya and Egypt, and distressed too perhaps by the consciousness of the king's inefficiency, invited Demonax, a Mantinean, by the advice of the Delphic oracle, to settle the constitution of the city. The conflicting claims of the original colonists with those of the later settlers, and the due distribution of power between the sovereign and the commonalt
Ba'ttus Iii. 5. BATTUS III., or "the lame" (*Xwlo/s), son of Arcesilaus JI., reigned from B. C. 550 to 530, or, as some state it, from 544 to 529. In his time, the Cyrenaeans, weakened by internal seditions, apprehensive of assaults from Libya and Egypt, and distressed too perhaps by the consciousness of the king's inefficiency, invited Demonax, a Mantinean, by the advice of the Delphic oracle, to settle the constitution of the city. The conflicting claims of the original colonists with those of the later settlers, and the due distribution of power between the sovereign and the commonalty, were the main difficulties with which he had to deal. With respect to the former point, he substituted for the old division of tribes an entirely new one, in which however some privileges, in regard to their relation to the *Peri/oikoi, were reserved to those of Theraean descent; while the royal power he reduced within very narrow limits, leaving to the king only certain selected lands, and the enj
Dontas (*Do/ntas), a Lacedaemonian statuary, was the disciple of Dipoenus and Scyllis, and therefore flourished about B. C. 550. He made the statues which were afterwards placed in the treasury of the Megarians at Olympia. They were of cedar inlaid with gold, and formed a group representing the contest of Heracles with the river Acheloüs, and containing figures of Zeus, Deianeira, Acheloüs, and Heracles, with Ares assisting Acheloüs, and Athena supporting Heracles. The latter statue seems, however, not to have been part of the original group, but a separate work by Medon. (Comp. Paus. 5.17. 1.) The group in the pediment of the Megarian treasury, representing the war of the gods and the giants, seems also to have been the work of Dontas; but the passage in Pausanias is not quite clear. (Paus. 6.19.9; Böckh, Corp. Inscrip. i. p. 47, &c.)
Dorycleidas (*Doruklei/das), a Lacedaemonian statuary, the brother of Medon, made the gold and ivory statue of Themis, in the temple of Hera at Olympia. He was a disciple of Dipoenus and Scyllis, and therefore flourished about B. C. 550. (Paus. 5.17.1.) [P.
Medon (*Me/dwn), a Lacedaemonian statuary, the brother of Dorycleidas, and the disciple of )ipoenus and Scyllis, made the gold and ivory statue of Athena in the Heraeum at Olympia (Paus. 5.17.1). He flourished about B. C. 550. [P.
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