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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 74 74 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 10 10 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 8 8 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 6 6 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 6 6 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 5 5 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to and from Quintus (ed. L. C. Purser) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero. You can also browse the collection for 56 BC or search for 56 BC in all documents.

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Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Public Life and Contemporary Politics. (search)
n the Palatine and damages for the loss of his house and villas. The unanimous acquittal, in Mar., 56 B.C., of P. Sestius, Cicero's foremost champion in 57 B.C., who was prosecuted on a charge de amb harmony in the party of the triumvirs. Emboldened by this state of things, the senate, on Apr. 5, 56 B.C., adopted Cicero's motion ut de agro Campano . . . Idibus Maiis referretur. Fam. 1.9.8. The nishes the explanation of that remarkable change which Cicero's political attitude underwent in 56 B.C. Quintus had promised Pompey that his brother, if recalled, would not oppose the triumvirs. As Rab. Post. 32. in 54 B.C., and in heaping praises upon Caesar in his oration de Prov. Cons., in 56 B.C. Cicero's own statement in Fam. 1.9, of his attitude during this period should be read in this connection. 20. The compact between Caesar, Pompey, and Crassus was renewed at Luca in Apr., 56 B.C., Q. fr. 2.5.3; Suet. Iul. 24. and, in accordance with its terms, Pompey and Crassus were elect
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Family and Friends. (search)
n at finding herself second to Tullia in his affection, and when she evinced joy a few months later at Tullia's death, Cicero sent her to her mother and could not be induced to receive her back into his favor. Att. 12.32.1. Tullia. 53. Tullia, Cicero's only daughter, was probably born in 79 or 78 B.C. In 66 B.C. she was betrothed to C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, Att. 1.3.3. and married him sometime within the next three years. He died during the year of Cicero's exile. pro Sest. 68. In 56 B.C. Tullia married Furius Crassipes. Q. fr. 2.4.2. The match was regarded as a good one, but for reasons unknown to us Crassipes and Tullia were soon divorced. Her next matrimonial venture was with P. Cornelius Dolabella, Att. 6.6.1; Fam. 8.6.1. the Caesarian politician. Their married life proved to be a most unhappy one, and they were probably divorced towards the close of the year 46 B.C. Fam. 6.18.5. Tullia herself died in Feb., 45 B.C.,Schmidt, Briefw. p.271. and her father was plunge
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XVI: ad Quintum fratrem 2.3 (search)
Letter XVI: ad Quintum fratrem 2.3 Rome, written Feb.12, sent Feb.15, 56 B.C. This letter presents in a graphic manner the disordered state of affairs in Rome in 56 B.C. and the isolation of Pompey. The latter fact led Pompey to meet Caesar at Luca in April and renew the Triumvirate, notwithstanding his manifest jealousy of Caesar and his open enmity towards Crassus; cf. Momm. Röm. Hist. IV. 354-370. antea: in his last letter, Q. fr. 2.2, written Jan. 17. legationes: i.e. audiences given t56 B.C. and the isolation of Pompey. The latter fact led Pompey to meet Caesar at Luca in April and renew the Triumvirate, notwithstanding his manifest jealousy of Caesar and his open enmity towards Crassus; cf. Momm. Röm. Hist. IV. 354-370. antea: in his last letter, Q. fr. 2.2, written Jan. 17. legationes: i.e. audiences given to foreign embassies. reiciebantur, were postponed. The reception of foreign embassies was the regular order of business for February. eo die: i.e. the Ides. res: Ptolemy Auletes, the king of Egypt, being unable to maintain his position at home, had fled to Rome for help, and in his absence the Alexandrians had placed his daughter Berenice on the throne. The senate, at the suggestion of the consul Lentulus Spinther, voted that the consul who should receive Cilicia as his province should restore
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XVII: ad Atticum 4.4b (search)
Letter XVII: ad Atticum 4.4b Antium, June, 56 B.C. perbelle: upon per in compounds, cf. Intr. 77. Bellefacis, bene facis, etc., are colloquial phrases to express gratitude. Cf. bene benigneque arbitror te facere, Plaut. Most. 816; bene hercle factum et habeo vobis gratiam, Plaut. Rud. 835. Tyrannionis: a grammarian and teacher who was brought to Rome as a prisoner by L. Lucullus. He was at one time tutor of the young Cicero. His services in arranging Cicero's books are mentioned inAtt. 4.8A; Q. fr. 3.4.5, and Ep. XXIII. 6 also. The place in which this letter was written is determined by comparing it with Att. 4.8 A. tuis librariolis: cf. Intr. 58. Some of Cicero's works were probably published by Atticus; cf. Att. 2.1.2 tu, si tibi placuerit liber, curabis ut et Athenis sit et in ceteris oppidis Graeciae. duos aliquos: an indefinite small number; cf. Cic. de Fin. 2.62 tres aliqui aut quattuor. glutinatoribus: strips of papyrus from 8 to 14 inches long and 3 to 12 inches wide w
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XVIII: ad familiares 5.12 (search)
Letter XVIII: ad familiares 5.12 Arpinum, June, 56 B.C. A thorough analysis of this letter to Lucceius, as Böckel points out, will reveal the fact that it is as carefully constructed as any of Cicero's orations: 1prooemium 2-3hortatio 4-8probatio 10conclusio Yet, while the earnestness of his purpose is apparent throughout, by the light conversational tone which he gives the letter Cicero glosses over the 'impudence' of his request, puts the seriousness of the offense against historical truth in the background, and strives to secure the consent of Lucceius on the score of friendship. For Cicero's own judgment of the epistle, cf. Att. 4.6.4 epistulam, Lucceio nunc quam misi, qua meas res ut scribat rogo, fac ut ab eo sumas--valde bella est. L. Lucceius was an orator and a man of some literary note. In politics and military affairs he was less successful; he was a candidate with Caesar for the consulship in 60 B.C. (cf. Ep. VI.11n), but was defeated, and in the Civil War was one o
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XIX: ad familiares 7.1 (search)
e use of alliteration in such everyday expressions in all languages is well known. Cf. Intr. 93, 102. venationes: from the introduction of the venatio at Rome in 186 B.C. , it was a favorite form of amusement with the people, and was carried to an almost incredible pitch of extravagance and barbarism by the later emperors. venabulo: the elephants were attacked with javelins by the Gaetulians (Plin. N. H. 8.20). misericordia: cf. introd. note. Galli Canini: L. Caninius Gallus, as tribune in 56 B.C. , proposed that the restoration of King Ptolemy should be entrusted to Pompey (Q. fr. 2.2.3). In the year following his tribuneship (55 B.C. ) he was attacked on some political charge by the enemies of Pompey, and Cicero defended him, doubtless at Pompey's request. With some two or three exceptions (e.g. Cic. de Or. 2.253) the cognomen is never placed before the nomen in formal Latin in the Ciceronian period but this order is common enough in colloquial Latin e.g. Bassus Caecilius, Ep. LXX
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XXII: ad Quintum fratrem 2.15 (search)
ever, decided by a majority of all the iudices, and in this instance there was a majority of four for acquittal. The number of jurors sitting in a trial was determined by the statute under which the charge was brought; the lowest number mentioned is 32, the highest 75 (cf. Madvig, Verf U. Verw. 2.308). Vatinium: P. Vatinius had made himself notorious during his tribuneship as Caesar's agent, but escaped punishment for his misdeeds. In 57 B.C. he failed as a candidate for the aedileship. In 56 B.C. he appeared as a witness against Sestius, whom Cicero was defending, and Cicero attacked him mercilessly. (cf. e.g. pro Sest. 132 ff.; in Vat. Interr.; Fam. 1.9.7; Q. fr. 2.4.1.) The trial here referred to was on an accusation de sodalidis in 54 B.C. Cicero undertook the defense at Caesar's request. For Cicero's explanation of his conduct, cf. Fam. 1.9.19. It is a significant fact that in his letters to Atticus he nowhere mentions the matter. Fam. 5.9, 10A and 10B are letters written to
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter XLV: ad Atticum 8.3 (search)
Cicero had received a letter from Pompey (Att. 8.11 A) directing him to proceed to Luceria at once and join the other Pompeians. He accordingly left Formiae on Feb. 17 (cf. Att. 8.11D. 1 ) and advanced to Cales, from which place this letter was written, apparently in the night of Feb. 18. Finding his way blocked by Caesar's troops, he turned back (cf. 7) and was in Formiae again Feb. 21. erga salutem meam: sc. in helping to secure his recall from exile. unius: i.e. Caesaris. provisum: in 56 B.C. Cicero had placated Caesar by withdrawing his opposition to certain of Caesar's agrarian laws (Q. fr. 2.6 [8]. 2), by speaking in favor of a grant of money to Caesar's troops (de Prov. Cons. 28), by extolling Caesar's success in Gaul, and by opposing the withdrawal of a province from him (de Prov. Cons. 17-35), and in 54 B.C. by defending some of Caesar's friends. summis honoribus imperusque: i.e. as praetor and consul. The connection precludes any reference to the military imperium which
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXXXVI: ad familiares 11.1 (search)
Herodian, 4.2.4, with note by Marquardt, Handbuch, VII. 348). The burial must have taken place, therefore, on or before Mar. 22, i.e. Mar. 20-22 (Ruete, 16). As for the date of this letter, there is no mention in it of Caesar's burial, so that it was probably written before Mar. 21-22. In fact, the remarks in 6 make it highly probable that it was written on the morning of Mar. 17. Decimus Junius Brutus Albinus had served under Caesar with distinction in the campaigns against the Veneti in 56 B.C. (cf. B. G. 3.11.5), and against Vercingetorix in 52 (cf. B. G. 7.9.1). He followed Caesar in the Civil War (cf. Caes. B. C. 1.56-58 et passim), and later served twice as governor of Gallia Vlterior. In spite of these favors from Caesar, he was one of the three most active and prominent leaders of the conspiracy (cf. Suet. Jul. 80; Vell. Paterc. 2.56), and induced Caesar to go to the curia on the Ides of March. Caesar had designated him as one of his second heirs and as governor of Galli