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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 63 63 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 8 8 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 5 5 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War. You can also browse the collection for 58 BC or search for 58 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War, Gaul and the Gauls. (search)
Gaul and the Gauls. I. THE GALLIC PROVINCE. The district upon whose government Caesar entered in the spring of B. C. 58 consisted primarily of the two Gallic provinces, Cisalpine and Transalpine. Cisalpine Gaul was the northern portion of Italy, which several centuries earlier had been occupied by invaders from Gaul proper, and was not yet reckoned politically as a part of Italy; it was a wealthy, populous, and orderly country, the proconsul's main dependence for troops and supplies, and his regular winter residence. Transalpine or Narbonnese Gaul received its name from its capital, the Roman colony Narbo. It contained some thriving cities and peaceful districts; but as a whole it had been but recently brought under the authority of Rome, and was still essentially a foreign country. It comprised the whole coast of the Mediterranean from the Pyrenees to the Alps, having for its northern boundary an irregular and uncertain line, which separated the terr
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War, The Campaigns in Gaul. (search)
The Campaigns in Gaul. The campaigns of Caesar in Gaul lasted through eight seasons (B. C. 58-51.), and are told in eight books, — the last written by Hirtius, an officer of Caesar, — each book containing the operations of a single year. The following is a brief outline: Book I. B. C. 58. Caesar checks the attempt of the Helvetians to settle in Western Gaul, and, after a bloody defeat, forces the remnant to return to their own territory. He then engages with a powerful B. C. 58. Caesar checks the attempt of the Helvetians to settle in Western Gaul, and, after a bloody defeat, forces the remnant to return to their own territory. He then engages with a powerful tribe of Germans, who had made a military settlement in Eastern Gaul, and drives them, with their chief, Ariovistus, back across the Rhine. Book II. B. C. 57. A formidable confederacy of the northern populations of Gaul is suppressed, with the almost complete extermination of the bravest Belgian tribe, the Nervii, in a battle which seems to have been one of the most desperate of all that Caesar ever fought. In this campaign the coast towns of the west and northwest (Brittany) also a