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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 63 63 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 13 13 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 8 8 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 5 5 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 3 3 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 58 BC or search for 58 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
he next year, Caesar, as consul, procured the passage of an iniquitous law for dividing the fertile and populous territory of Campania among needy citizens of Rome. Cicero refused to serve on the board appointed to execute this law. Thus he not only exasperated the mob, but brought down upon himself the resentment of the triumvirs,who, though two of them, Caesar and Pompey, still professed to be his personal friends, refused to protect him against the attacks of his enemies. Accordingly, in B.C. 58, Clodius, then tribune, In order to be eligible for this oflice, Clodius, by birth a patrician, had procured his adoption into a plebeian family. His express purpose in the whole transaction was to accomplish the ruin of Cicero. For the cause of his animosity, see note on Defence of Milo, sect. 13 (p. 176, l. 14). brought forward a law that whoever had put to death a Roman citizen, without trial, "should be denied the use of fire and water" (the Roman formula for banishment). This bill was
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 18 (search)
M. Papirium: this was one of Clodius's earliest exploits. Papirius, a friend of Pompey, was killed in a brawl about a son of Tigranes, held as hostage at Rome, whom Clodius was trying to rescue and send back for a great ransom to Asia, having by a trick got him out of the hands of his custodian. non fuit, etc.: an illustration of the idea expressed in impune, 1.16, above. quae, te. the Appian Way. templo Castoris, where the Senate was then holding session. The circumstance took place in the year of Clodius's tribunate (B.C. 58), while Pompey was in the Senate. "he instantly went home and stayed there."
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 22 (search)
quod, in that: ยง 572, a (333, a); B. 299, 2 ; G. 525, 2 ; H. 588, 31 N. (516, 2, N.); H-B. 552, 2. Domiti: L. Domitius Ahenobarbus (consul, B.C. 54), afterwards a leader against Caesar in the Civil War, an arrogant and uncompromising upholder of the aristocracy. The emperor Nero was his descendant. consularem: sc. praeesse. documenta maxima: in his praetorship (B.C. 58) Domitius had roughly cut his way through a crowd of the followers of Clodius, killing many of them.