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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 37 37 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 6 6 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 6 6 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 4 4 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 40-42 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Sulpicia, Carmina Omnia (ed. Anne Mahoney) 1 1 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, Sicily and the Other Islands (ed. Horace White), Fragments (search)
that he would come to receive the surrender of the island later. Metellus paid no attention to this order, but pushed on the war until the island was subdued, making the same terms with Lasthenes as he had made with Panares. B.C. 69 Metellus was awarded a triumph and the title of Creticus with more justice than Antonius, for he actually subjugated the island.Cf. Florus, iii. 7. FROM PEIRESC Y.R. 692 The patrician Clodius, surnamed Pulcher, which means B.C. 62 handsome, was in love with Cæsar's wife. He arrayed himself in woman's clothes from head to foot, being still without a beard, and gained admission to Cæsar's house as a woman in the night, at a time when the mysteries [of the Bona Dea] were celebrated, to which only women were admitted. Having lost his guide, and being detected by others by the sound of his voice, he was hustled out.This was one of the important events in Roman history, both in its consequences and as showing the rottenness o
Appian, Mithridatic Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER XVII (search)
on of Hystaspes; others came from the kingdom of the Ptolemies, having been deposited by Cleopatra at the island of Cos and given by the inhabitants to Mithridates; still others had been made or collected by Mithridates himself, as he was a lover of the beautiful in furniture as well as in other things. Y.R. 692 At the end of the winter Pompey distributed rewards to the army; 1500 Attic drachmas to each soldier and in like proportion to the officers, the whole, it was said, B.C. 62 amounting to 16,000 talents. Then he marched to Ephesus, embarked for Italy, and hastened to Rome, having dismissed his soldiers at Brundusium to their homes, by which act his popularity was greatly increased among the Romans. As he approached the city he was met by successive processions, first of youths, farthest from the city, then bands of men of different ages came out as far as they severally could walk; last of all came the Senate, which was lost in wonder at his exploits, for no one ha
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), BOOK II, CHAPTER I (search)
conspirators from the houses where they were in custody to the prison, without the knowledge of the crowd, and saw them put to death. Then he went back to the forum and signified that they were dead. The crowd dispersed in alarm, congratulating themselves that they had not been found out. Thus the city breathed freely once more after the great fear that had weighed upon it that day. Y.R. 692 Catiline had assembled about 20,000 troops, of whom B.C. 62 one-fourth part were already armed, and was moving toward Gaul in order to complete his preparations, when Antonius, the other consul, overtook him beyond the AlpsThe battle was fought at Pistoria, at the southern base of the Apennines. The Roman army was commanded, not by the consul Antonius, but by his lieutenant Petreius, who is described by Sallust as one who had "served with great reputation for more than thirty years as military tribune, pref
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK XI., CHAPTER I. (search)
rely upon his authority respecting what is uncertain, when he has nothing probable to advance on the subject; for he reasons so falsely respecting things which are evident, and this too when he enjoyed the friendship of Pompey, who had carried on war against the Iberes and Albani, and was acquainted with both the Caspian and ColchianThe Euxine. Seas on each side of the isthmus. It is related, that when PompeyPompey appears to have visited this philosopher twice on this occa- sion, B. C. 62, and B. C. 67, on the termination of his eastern campaigns. was at Rhodes, on his expedi- tion against the pirates, (he was soon afterwards to carry on war against Mithridates and the nations as far as the Caspian Sea,) he accidentally heard a philosophical lecture of Posidonius; and on his departure he asked Posidonius if he had any commands; to which he replied, To stand the first in worth, as in command.Il. vi. 208. Pope.Il. vi. 208. Pope. Add to this, that he wrote the hist
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Friends and foes. (search)
d c. 2 with Alfenus Varus of c. 30 is unsatisfactory. 67. The Manlius Torquatus, whose marriage with Vinia Aurunculeia is celebrated in c. 61, was perhaps the L. Manlius Torquatus whose father was consul in 65 B.C. (cf. Hor. Carm. III.21., Epod. 13.6), and who was himself praetor in 49. He allied himself with the Pompeians, and was killed in Africa in 47 (cf. Bell. Afr. 96). In 62 B.C. Manlius prosecuted P. Cornelius Sulla on the charge of conspiracy with Catiline. Cicero and Hortensius appeared for the defence and secured an acquittal. In Cicero's speech on that occasion (Pro Sulla), and especially in his Brutus (76. 265), Manlius is highly praised. 68. A certain Veranius is mentioned in cc. 12, 28, and 47 in connection with a Fabullus, evidently an intimate friend of hi
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser), ad Q. Metellvm et ceteros, Scr. in Gallia m. Ian. a. 692 (62). Q. METELLVS Q. F. CELER PROCOS. S. D. M. TVLLIO CICERONI. (search)
Scr. in Gallia m. Ian. a. 692 (62). Q. METELLVS Q. F. CELER PROCOS. S. D. M. TVLLIO CICERONI. si vales, benest. existimaram pro mutuo inter nos animo et pro reconciliata gratia nec absentem me a te ludibrio laesum in nec Metellum fratrem ob dictum capite ac fortunis per te oppugnatum iri. quem si parum pudor ipsius defendebat, debebat vel familiae nostrae dignitas vel meum studium erga vos remque publicam satis sublevare. nunc video illum circumventum, me desertum, a quibus minime conveniebat. itaque in luctu et squalore sum, qui provinciae, qui exercitui praesum, qui bellum gero. quae quoniam nec ratione nec maiorum nostrorum clementia administrastis, non erit mirandum, si vos paenitebit. te tam mobili in me meosque esse animo non sperabam. me interea nec domesticus dolor nec cuiusquam iniuria ab re p. abducet.
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser), ad Q. Metellvm et ceteros, Scr. Romae vel ex. m. Ian. vel in. Febr. a. 692 (62). M. TVLLIVS M. F. CICERO Q. METELLO Q. F. CELERI PROCOS. S. D. (search)
Scr. Romae vel ex. m. Ian. vel in. Febr. a. 692 (62). M. TVLLIVS M. F. CICERO Q. METELLO Q. F. CELERI PROCOS. S. D. si tu exercitusque valetis, benest. scribis ad me 'te existimasse pro mutuo inter nos animo et pro reconciliata gratia numquam te a me ludibrio laesum in.' quod cuius modi sit, satis intellegere non possum, sed tamen suspicor ad te esse adlatum me in senatu, cum disputarem permultos esse qui rem p. a me conservatam dolerent, dixisse a te propinquos tuos, quibus negare non potuisses, impetrasse ut ea, quae statuisses tibi in senatu de mea laude esse dicenda, reticeres. quod cum dicerem, illud adiunxi mihi tecum ita dispertitum officium fuisse in rei p. salute retinenda, ut ego urbem a domesticis insidiis et ab intestino scelere, tu Italiam et ab armatis hostibus et ab occulta coniuratione defenderes, atque hanc nostram tanti et tam praeclari muneris societatem a tuis propinquis labefactatam, qui, cum tu a me rebus amplissimis atque honorificentissimis ornatus ess
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser), ad Q. Metellvm et ceteros, Scr. Romae ex m. Nov. aut in. Dec. a. 692 (62). M. CICERO S. D. C. ANTONIO M. F. IMP. (search)
Scr. Romae ex m. Nov. aut in. Dec. a. 692 (62). M. CICERO S. D. C. ANTONIO M. F. IMP. etsi statueram nullas ad te litteras mittere nisi commendaticias (non quo eas intellegerem satis apud te valere, sed ne iis, qui me rogarent, aliquid de nostra coniunctione imminutum esse ostenderem), tamen, cum T. Pomponius, homo omnium meorum in te studiorum et officiorum maxime conscius, tui cupidus, nostri amantissimus, ad te proficisceretur, aliquid mihi scribendum putavi, praesertim cum aliter ipsi Pomponio satis facere non possem. ego si abs te summa officia desiderem mirum nemini videri debeat. omnia enim a me in te profecta sunt, quae ad tuum commodum, quae ad honorem, quae ad dignitatem pertinerent. pro his rebus nullam mihi abs te relatam esse gratiam tu es optimus testis, contra etiam esse aliquid abs te profectum ex multis audivi; nam 'comperisse' me non audeo dicere, ne forte id ipsum verbum ponam, quod abs te aiunt falso in me solere conferri. sed ea, quae ad me delata sunt,
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser), ad Q. Metellvm et ceteros, Scr. Romae circ. Id. Dec. a. 692 (62) M. CICERO S. D. P. SESTIO L. F. PROQ. (search)
Scr. Romae circ. Id. Dec. a. 692 (62) M. CICERO S. D. P. SESTIO L. F. PROQ. Cum ad me Decius librarius venisset egissetque mecum, ut operam darem ne tibi hoc tempore succederetur, quamquam illum hominem frugi et tibi amicum existimabam, tamen, quod memoria tenebam, cuius modi ad me litteras antea misisses, non satis credidi homini prudenti tam valde esse mutatam voluntatem tuam. sed, postea quam et Cornelia tua Terentiam convenit, et ego cum Q. Cornelio locutus sum, adhibui diligentiam, quotienscumque senatus fuit, ut adessem, plurimumque in eo negoti habui ut Q. Fufium, tr. pl., et ceteros, ad quos tu scripseras, cogerem is mihi potius credere quam tuis litteris. omnino res tota in mensem Ianuarium reiecta erat, sed facile obtinebatur. ego tua gratulatione commotus, quod ad me pridem scripseras velle te bene evenire, quod de Crasso domum emissem, cmi cani ipsam domum X_X_X_V_ aliquanto post tuam gratulationem. itaque nunc me scito tantum habere acris alieni, ut cupiam coniur
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser), ad Q. Metellvm et ceteros, Scr. Romae m. Apr. a. 692 (62). M. TVLLIVS M. F. CICERO S. D. CN. POMPEIO CN. fl (search)
Scr. Romae m. Apr. a. 692 (62). M. TVLLIVS M. F. CICERO S. D. CN. POMPEIO CN. fl MAGNO IMPERATORI. S. T. E. Q. V. B. E. ex litteris tuis, quas publice misisti, cepi una cum omnibus incredibilem voluptatem; tantam enim spem oti ostendisti, quantam ego semper omnibus te uno fretus pollicebar. sed hoc scito, tuos veteres hostis, novos amicos, vehementer litteris perculsos atque ex magna spe deturbatos iacere. ad me autem litteras quas misisti, quamquam exiguam significationem tuae erga me voluntatis habebant, tamen mihi scito iucundas fuisse; nulla enim re tam laetari soleo quam meorum officiorum conscientia; quibus si quando non mutue respondetur, apud me plus offici residere facillime patior. illud non dubito quin, si te mea summa erga te studia parum mihi adiunxerint, res publica nos inter nos conciliatura coniuncturaque sit. ac ne ignores quid ego in tuis litteris desiderarim, scribam aperte, sicut et mea natura et nostra amicitia postulat. res eas gessi, quarum aliqu
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