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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cimber, P. Gabi'nius one of the Catilinarian conspirators, B. C. 63. (Cic. in Cat. 3.3, 5, 6, 4.6.)
Consi'dius 5. Q. Considius, the usurer, may perhaps be the same as the preceding, especially as the anecdote related of him is in accordance with the character which Cicero gives of the senator. It is related of this Considius, that, when in the Catilinarian conspiracy, B. C. 63, the value of all property had been so much depreciated that it was impossible even for the wealthy to pay their creditors, he did not call in the principal or interest of any of the sums due to him, although he had 15 millions of sesterces out at interest, endeavouring by this indulgence to mitigate, as far as he could, the general alarm. (V. Max. 4.8.3; comp. Cic. Att. 1.12.)
Corne'lius 4. C. Cornelius, a Roman knight, and one of Catiline's crew, undertook, in conjunction with L. Vargunteius to murder Cicero in B. C. 63, but their plan was frustrated by information conveyed to Cicero through Curius and Fulvia. When accused subsequently, he could obtain no one to defend him; but he escaped punishment probably on account of the information he gave respecting the conspiracy. When P. Sulla was accused in B. C. 62 of participation in the conspiracy, Cornelius caused his son to come frward as a witness against him. (Sal. Cat. 17, 28; Cic. pro Sull. 2, 6, 18.)
Cosco'nius 5. C. Cosconius, praetor in B. C. 63, the same year that Cicero was consul, obtained in the following-year the province of Further Spain, with the title of proconsul, and was, it seems, on his return accused of extortion, but acquitted. He was one of the twenty commissioners appointed in B. C. 59 to carry into execution the agrarian law of Julius Caesar for dividing the public lands in Campania, but he died in this year, and his vacant place was offered to Cicero by Caesar, who wished to withdraw him from the threatened attack of Clodius. This offer, however, was refused by Cicero. (Cic. pro Sull. 14, in Vatin. 5; comp. V. Max. 8.1.8; Cic. Att. 2.19, 9.2, A; Quint. Inst. 12.1. . ยง 16.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
a time from Rome. In the year B. C. 65, Crassus was censor with Q. Catulus, the firm supporter of the senate; but the censors, in consequence of their political discordance, passed the period of their office without holding a census or a muster of the equites. In the following year, Crassus failed in his wish to obtain the rich province of Egypt. Crassus was suspected by some, probably without sufficient reason, of being privy to the first conspiracy of Catiline; and again, in the year B. C. 63, L. Tarquinius, when he was arrested on his way to Catiline, affirmed that he was sent by Crassus with a message inviting Catiline to come with speed to the rescue of his friends at Rome ; but the senate denounced the testimony of L. Tarquinius as a calumny, and Crassus himself attributed the charge to the subornation of Cicero. (Sall. B. C. 48.) The interests of Crassus were opposed to the success of the conspiracy; for it would have required a man of higher order to seize and retain the h
. He must therefore have attained to mature manhood in B. C. 95, the year of the birth of Cato of Utica, whose father's friend he was, and who, we know, was left an orphan at a very early age. (Plut. Crass. 17, Cat. Min. 12, 15; Pseudo-Appian, Parth. p. 136; comp, CATO, p. 647a.) Deiotarus adhered firmly to the Romans in their wars in Asia, and in B. C. 74 defeated in Phrygia the generals of Mithridates. For his services he was honoured by the senate with the title of king, and, probably in B. C. 63, the year of the death of Mithridates, had Gadelonitis and Armenia Minor added to his dominions. Appian, apparently by an oversight, says that Pompey made him tetrarch of Galatia. He succeeded, indeed, doubtless by Roman favour, in encroaching on the rights of the other tetrarchs of that district, and obtaining nearly the whole of it for himself. (Strab. xii. pp. 547, 567; Casaub. ad loc.; Plut. Pomp. 38; Appian, Bell. Mithr. 114; Cic. pro Deiot. 13, Phil. 11.12, de Har. Resp. 13; Hirt. Bel
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
in later times at least, that he had predicted in the most unambiguous terms the future greatness of Octavianus on hearing the announcement of his birth; and in the Eusebian Chronicle he is styled " Pythagoricus et Magus." He, moreover, possessed considerable influence in political affairs during the last struggles of the republic; was one of the senators selected by Cicero to take down the depositions and examinations of the witnesses who gave evidence with regard to Catiline's conspiracy, B. C. 63; was praetor in B. C. 59; took an active part in the civil war on the side of Pompey; was compelled in consequence by Caesar to live abroad, and died in exile B. C. 44. The letter of consolation addressed to him by Cicero (Cic. Fam. 4.13), which contains a very warm tribute to his learning and worth, is still extant. A. Gellius, who entertained the strongest admiration for the talents and acquirements of Figulus, says that his works were little studied, and were of no practical value, in
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Flaccus, Vale'rius 15. L. Valerius Flaccus, a son of No. 11, served in Cilicia as tribune of the soldiers, under P. Servilius, in B. C. 78, and afterwards as quaestor, under M. Calpurnius Piso, in Spain. (Cic. pro FLacc. 3.) He was praetor in B. C. 63, the year of Cicero's consulship, who through his assistance got possession of the documents which the Allobrogian ambassadors had received from the accomplices of Catiline. In the year after his praetorship he had the administration of Asia, in which he was succeeded by Q. Cicero. (Cic. pro Flacc. 13, 14, 21, 40.) In B. C. 59 he was accused by D. Laelius of having been guilty of extortion in his province of Asia; but Flaccus, although he was undoubtedly guilty, was defended by Cicero (in the oration pro Flacco, which is still extant) and Q. Hortensius, and was acquitted. (Comp. Cic. in Cut. 3.2, 6 ; ad Att. 1.19, 2.25, in Pison, 23; the oration pro Flacco; pro Planc. 11; Schol. Bob. p. Flacc. p.228 ; Sallust, Sal. Cat. 45.)
Ga'llius 1. Q. Gallius, was a candidate for the praetorship in B. C. 64, and accused of ambitus by M. Calidius; but he was defended on that occasion by Cicero in an oration of which only a few fragments have come down to us. He appears to have been acquitted, for he was invested with the city praetorship in B. C. 63, and presided at the trial of C. Cornelius. (Cic. Brut. 80, de Petit. Cons. 5; Ascon. in Cic. in tog. cand. p. 88, in Cornel. p. 62, ed. Orelli. See the fragments of Cicero's oration for Gallius in Orelli's edition, vol. iv. part 2, p. 454, &c.; V. Max. 8.10.3.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Gallus, Fa'dius 3. T. Fadius Gallus, was quaestor of Cicero in his consulship, B. C. 63, and tribune of the people in B. C. 57, in which year he exerted himself with others to effect the recal of Cicero from exile. At a later period T. Fadius himself appears to have lived in exile, and Cicero in a letter still extant (ad Fam. 5.18) consoled him in his misfortune. (Cic. ad Q. Frat. 1.4, ad Att. 3.23, post Red. in Senat. 8, ad Fam. 7.27.) [L.S]
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