hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 109 109 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 8 8 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 31-34 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. Professor of Latin and Head of the Department of Classics in the University of Pittsburgh) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 63 BC or search for 63 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
lar succession of curule offices. After his praetorship he refused a province See p. lxi. in order to remain at home and canvass for his consulship. Consulship (B.C. 63). For the consulship of B.C. 63 there were six candidates, but of these only Cicero, Catiline, and C. Antonius were prominent. The contest was not merely one of pB.C. 63 there were six candidates, but of these only Cicero, Catiline, and C. Antonius were prominent. The contest was not merely one of personal ambition. The first and second conspiracies of Catiline, as well as his notorious character, could have left no doubt that his aims were treasonable. Antonius had combined with him for mutual support in securing election by illegal means, and was himself a weak and unprincipled man. On the other hand, Cicero was a novus hoer, and he always regarded it as one of the greatest of human achievements. In fact, however, it marked the beginning of his downfall. Consulship to Banishment (B.C. 63-58). The execution of the conspirators without the forms of law was a blunder, and grievously did Cicero answer for it. He had distinctly violated the constitutio