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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 47 47 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 9 9 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 2 2 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 65 BC or search for 65 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 6 (search)
ves in the general scramble of a revolution. Idibus: the Calends and Ides — the beginning and middle of the month—were the usual times for the payment of debts. Catiline's failure in his consular canvass had probably stirred up his creditors to push him for payment. cum: causal, but best translated by when. pridie Kalendas Januarias, etc.: Dec.31, B.C. 66. The act here mentioned seems to have been in preparation for a rising that had been planned by Catiline for the next day, Jan. 1, B.C. 65. On this day the consuls Cotta and Torquatus entered upon their office, and it was the intention of Catiline to take advantage of their inauguration to murder them and seize the government. The plot got whispered about, and its execution was put off to Feb. 5, when it failed again through Catiline's precipitancy in giving the word. cum telo (a technical expression), weapon in hand. manum: a band (of assassins). interficiendorum causi: § 504, b (298, c); cf. B. 338, I, c; G. 428, R.2; H
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 13 (search)
jam diu: the conspiracy was ready to break out B.C. 65 (see note on p. 105, l. 15). versamur, have lived. nescio quo pacto, somehow or other; § 575, d (344, a); B. 253, 6; G. 467, N.; Cf. H. 512, 7 (455, 2); H-B. 537, e. veteris (sharply contrasted with nostri), i.e. the disease is of long standing, but its outbreak has occurred just in my consulship. visceribus, vitals (properly the great interior organs, as the heart, lungs, etc.). aestu febrique, the heat of fever (hendiadys). reliquis vivis: abl. absolute. circumstare, hang round, for the purpose of intimidation: the praetor urbanus had his tribunal in the Forum. patefacta, laid bare; inlustrata, set in full light; oppressa, crushed; vindicata, punished. Observe the climax. ominibus, prospects. What Cicero has just said (p.112,11. I 1-16) makes the omen under which Catiline is to depart, — an omen of good for the state, but of evil for him. Juppiter: thus the oration closes with a prayer to Jupiter Stator
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 8 (search)
following), but still more we can almost see it with our own eyes. quod . . . potuisse (parenthetical), because, etc. consili (pred. gen. limiting gubernatio), to belong to human wisdom. possemas: for tense, see § 485, a (287, a); B. 268, 7; G. 511, a.3; H. 546 (495, i); H.-B. 481. faces, etc.: these omens are such as the Romans observed and noted carefully. Livy's history is full of them. praetermittendam, inadvertently; relinquendam, intentionally. Cotta et Torquato: consuls B.C. 65, the year in which Catiline first intended to carry out his conspiracy. aera: the laws were engraved on bronze tables. ille . . . Romulas: there is a bronze statue of the wolf suckling the infants in the Capitoline Museum at Rome, which bears marks either of lightning seaming one of its hind legs, or of some defect in the casting (Fig. 36). This is probably identical with that here mentioned. haruspices: see note on p. 130, l. 14. flexissent: in direct disc. flexerint, following ap