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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 665 BC or search for 665 BC in all documents.

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e strophe and antistrophe, in his poems. Dialect The dialect of Alcman was the Spartan Doric, with an intermixture of the Aeolic. The popular idioms of Laconia appear most frequently in his more familiar poems. Assessment The Alexandrian grammarians placed Alcman at the head of their canon of the nine lyric poets. Among the proofs of his popularity may be mentioned the tradition, that his songs were sung, with those of Terpander, at the first performance of the gymnopaedia at Sparta (B. C. 665, Aelian, Ael. VH 12.50), and the ascertained fact, that they were frequently afterwards used at that festival. (Athen. 15.678.) The few fragments which remain scarcely allow us to judge how far he deserved his reputation; but some of them display a true poetical spirit. Editions Alcman's poems comprised six books, the extant fragments of which are included in the collections of Neander, H. Stephens, and Fulvius Ursinus. The latest and best edition is that of Welcker, Giessen, 1815. [P.S
ginally a native of Samos, whence, by a curious parallel to the history of Archilochus, he led a colony to the neighbouring island of Amorgos, one of the Cyclades or Sporades, where he founded three cities, Minoa, Aegialus, and Arcesine, in the first of which he fixed his own abode. (Comp. Strab. x. p.487; Steph. Byz. s. v. *)Amorgo/s; Tzetz. Chil. 12.52.) He is generally said to have been contemporary with Archilochus ; and the date assigned to him by the chronographers is Ol. 29. 1 or 3, B. C. 665/4 or 662/1 (Syncell. p. 213; Hieronym. apud A. Maium, Script. Vet. vol. viii. p. 333; Clem. Alex. Strom. vol. i. p. 333; Cyril. c. Julian. vol. i. p. 12). The statement of Suidas that he flourished 490 years after the Trojan War, would, according to the vulgar era, the epoch of Eratosthenes, place him at (1183 -- 490=) B. C. 693; or, according to the era of Democritus, at (1150 -- 490=) B. C. 660, which agrees with the chronographers. (See Clinton, F. H. vol. i. s. aa. 712, 665, 662; and
ginally a native of Samos, whence, by a curious parallel to the history of Archilochus, he led a colony to the neighbouring island of Amorgos, one of the Cyclades or Sporades, where he founded three cities, Minoa, Aegialus, and Arcesine, in the first of which he fixed his own abode. (Comp. Strab. x. p.487; Steph. Byz. s. v. *)Amorgo/s; Tzetz. Chil. 12.52.) He is generally said to have been contemporary with Archilochus ; and the date assigned to him by the chronographers is Ol. 29. 1 or 3, B. C. 665/4 or 662/1 (Syncell. p. 213; Hieronym. apud A. Maium, Script. Vet. vol. viii. p. 333; Clem. Alex. Strom. vol. i. p. 333; Cyril. c. Julian. vol. i. p. 12). The statement of Suidas that he flourished 490 years after the Trojan War, would, according to the vulgar era, the epoch of Eratosthenes, place him at (1183 -- 490=) B. C. 693; or, according to the era of Democritus, at (1150 -- 490=) B. C. 660, which agrees with the chronographers. (See Clinton, F. H. vol. i. s. aa. 712, 665, 662; and