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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 41 41 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), Ab Urbe Condita, books 5-7 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero. You can also browse the collection for 69 BC or search for 69 BC in all documents.

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Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Public Life and Contemporary Politics. (search)
estion must have belonged in most instances to the political party whose interests would be promoted by the success of that side. What could be more natural than that Cicero, belonging to the equestrian class, whose rights and privileges had been so seriously curtailed in the aristocratic reaction of Sulla, should oppose the aristocracy at some points? The aid which his action gave to the democratic cause does not, however, stamp him as a democrat. 5. As a candidate for the aedileship for 69 B.C., and for the praetorship for 66 B.C., Cicero led all of his rivals at the polls.in Pison. 2; de leg. Manil. 2. Both offices he filled with distinction, and although as praetor he showed, as in earlier years, slight democratic tendencies, Herzog, 1. p. 538.his personal integrity and his intimate knowledge of the law made his administration of the office wise and honorable. Throughout this period, even during his incumbency of the two offices just mentioned, Cicero followed unremittingly his
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter V: ad Atticum 1.16 (search)
Intr. 99. Pisonem: though consul, and ordered by the senate to further the passage of the law by the comitia, Piso was really acting in the interests of Clodius. Cf. note to senatus auctoritas above. Curionem: father of the Curio who, as tribune in 50 B.C. , defended Caesar so brilliantly in the senate. He led the opposition in the senate to the bill of investigation (Att. 1.14.5). senum: Piso and the elder Curio. iuventutis: the younger Curio and young men like him. Hortensius: consul in 69 B.C. , and the most prominent leader of the Optimates at this time. He had been the leading orator in Rome until Cicero appeared; cf. Brut. 1.1. de religione: concerning the sacrilege which had been committed. legem ferret: a technical expression, used of bringing forward a bill. A rogatio was a bill submitted to the people for confirmation in the comitia, for which the people were asked to vote, and affirmative ballots were marked V. R. (uti rogas). The rogatio was in this case to be submitte
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXV: ad familiares 6.6 (search)
an old Etruscan family, was a man of considerable ability, both as a writer and as an orator. Cf. Sen. Nat. Quaest. 2.56.1 hoc apud Caecinam invenia, facundum virum et qui habuisset aliquando in eloquentia nomen, nisi illum Ciceronis umbra pressisset. In fact it was his course as a political pamphleteer, rather than as a soldier, which led Caesar to banish him (cf. Suet. Iul. 75). He was at this time in Sicily. It was in his father's behalf that Cicero delivered the oration pro Caecina in 69 B.C. Cicero wrote two other letters to the younger Caecina (viz. Fam. 6.5 and 8), one in his behalf (Fam. 13.66), and received one from him (Fam. 6.7). studiorum parium: Caecina was an authority upon the Etruscan method of interpreting omens, and had written a book, de Etrusca Disciplina, while Cicero, after his elevation to the augurate, had interested himself in the same class of subjects, and had written a treatise called de Auguriis. Cf. also Fam. 6.9.1. litterarum: used as a plural; cf.