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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 45 45 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 4 4 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 70 BC or search for 70 BC in all documents.

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Ahenobarbus 7. L. DOMITIUS CN. F. CN. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of No. 4, is first mentioned in B. C. 70 by Cicero, as a witness against Verres. In 61 he was curule aedile, when he exhibited a hundred Numidian lions, and continued the games so long, that the people were obliged to leave the circus before the exhibition was over, in order to take food, which was the first time they had done so. (D. C. 37.46; Plin. Nat. 8.54; this pause in the games was called diludium, Hor. Ep. 1.19. 47.) He married Porcia, the sister of M. Cato, and in his aedileship supported the latter in his proposals against bribery at elections, which were directed against Pompey, who was purchasing votes for Afranius. The political opinions of Ahenobarbus coincided with those of Cato; he was throughout his life one of the strongest supporters of the aristocratical party. He took an active part in opposing the measures of Caesar and Pompey after their coalition, and in 59 was accused by Vettius, at the instigation of C
Amphi'crates (*)Amfikra/ths), a Greek sophist and rhetorician of Athens. He was a contemporary of Tigranes (B. C. 70), and being exiled (we know not for what reason) from Athens, he went to Seleuceia on the Tigris. The inhabitants of this place requested him to teach rhetoric in their city, but he haughtily refused, saying, that the vessel was too small to contain a dolphin. He then went to Cleopatra, the daughter of Mithridates, who was married to Tigranes, and who seems to have become attached to him. Amphicrates soon drew suspicions upon himself, and was forbidden to have any intercourse with the Greeks, whereupon he starved himself to death. (Plut. Luc. 22.) Longinus (de Sublim. p. 54, ed. Toup) mentions him along with Hegesias and Matris, and censures him for his affectation of sublimity. Whether he is the same person as the Amphicrates who wrote a work on celebrated men (peri\ e)ndo/cwn andrw=n, Athen. 13.576; D. L. 2.101), is uncertain. [L.
Aristobu'lus 2. The younger son of Alexander Jannaeus and Alexandra. (J. AJ 13.16.1; Bell. Jud. 1. 5.1.) During the nine years of his mother's reign he set himself against the party of the Pharisees, whose influence she had restored; and after her death, B. C. 70, he made war against his eldest brother Hyrcanus, and obtained from him the resignation of the crown and the high-priesthood, chiefly through the aid of his father's friends, whom Alexandra had placed in the several fortresses of the country to save them from the vengeance of the Pharisees. (J. AJ 13.16, 14.1.2; Bell. Jud. 1.5, 6.1.) In B. C. 65 Judaea was invaded by Aretas, king of Arabia Petraea, with whom, at the instigation of Antipater the Idumaean, Hyrcanus had taken refuge. By him Aristobulus was defeated in a battle and besieged in Jerusalem but Aretas was obliged to raise the siege by Scaurus and Gabinius, Pompey's lieutenants, whose intervention Aristobulus had purchased. (J. AJ 14.2, 3.2; Bell. Jud. 1.6. §§ 2, 3.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or SANATROCES (search)
Arsaces Xi. or SANATROCES SANATROCES, as he is called on coins. Phlegon calls him Sinatruces; Appian, Sintricus; and Lucian, Sinatrocles. He had lived as an exile among the Scythian people called Sacauraces, and was placed by them upon the throne of Parthia, when he was already eighty years of age. He reigned seven years, and died while Lucullus was engaged in the war against Tigranes, about B. C. 70. (Lucian, Macrob. 15 ; Phlegon, apud Phot. Cod. 97, p. 84, ed. Bekker ; Appian, App. Mith. 104.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Bassus, Lucilius was promoted by Vitellius from the command of a squadron of cavalry to be admiral of the fleet at Ravenna and Misenum, B. C. 70; but disappointed at not obtaining the command of the praetorian troops, he betrayed the fleet to Vespasian. After the death of Vitellius, Bassus was sent to put down some disturbances in Campania. (Tac. Hist. 2.100, 3.12, 36, 40, 4.3.) His name occurs in an inscription. (Gruter, p. 573.)
was not large, he soon had recourse to the usurers, who looked for repayment to the offices which he was sure to obtain from the people. It was about this time that the people elected him to the office of military tribune instead of his competitor, C. Popilius; but he probably served for only a short time, as he is not mentioned during the next three years (B. C. 78-71) as serving in any of the wars which were carried on at that time against Mithridates, Spartacus, and Sertorius. The year B. C. 70 was a memorable one, as some of Sulla's most important alterations in the constitution were then repealed. This was chiefly owing to Pompey, who was then consul with M. Crassus. Pompey had been one of Sulla's steady supporters, and was now at the height of his glory; but his great power had raised him many enemies among the aristocracy, and he was thus led to join to some extent the popular party. It was Pompey's doing that the tribunicial power was restored in this year; and it was also th
M. Caeso'nius one of the judices at Rome, an upright man, who displayed his integrity in the inquiry into the murder of Cluentius, B. C. 74, when C. Junius presided over the court. He was aedile elect with Cicero in B. C. 70, and consequently would not have been able to act as judex in the following year, as a magistrate was not allowed to discharge the duties of judex during his year of office. This was one reason among others why the friends of Verres were anxious to postpone his trial till B. C. 69. The praetorship of Caesonius is not mentioned, but he must have obtained it in the same year as Cicero, namely, B. C. 66, as Cicero writes to Atticus in 65, that there was some talk of Caesonius becoming a candidate with him for the consulship. (Cic. Verr. Act. 1.10 ; Pseudo-Ascon. in loc. ; Cic. Att. 1.1.) This Caesonius is probably the one whom Cicero speaks of in B. C. 45. (Ad Att. 12.11.)
faction, he was defeated by Catulus in the battle of the Milvian bridge, and forced to take refuge in Sardinia, where he soon after perished in an attempt to organize an insurrection. [LEPIDUS.] Catulus, although trite to his party and his principles, denounced the corrupt practices which disgraced the senate while they possessed the exclusive right to act as judices on criminal trials; his opinion upon this subject was most unequivocally expressed when Pompeius brought forward his measure (B. C. 70) for restoring the privileges of the tribunes, and his presence as a judex upon the impeachment of Verres was probably one of the circumstances which deprived the culprit of all hope. He came forward as an opponent of the Gabinian and Manilian laws (B. C. 67 and 66), and Cicero records the tribute paid by the populace, on the latter occasion, to his character and talents; for when, in the course of an argument against the extravagant powers which the contemplated enactment proposed to besto
uppression of the servile war of Spartacus. They, however, discharged harmoniously the duties of their joint consulship (B. C. 70), and seem to have felt that it was necessary for their interests to control the high aristocratical faction, for by theS.] ** Pro L. Vareno B. C. 71, probably. [VARENUS.] * Pro M. Tullio B. C. 71. [M. TULLIUS.] Pro C. Mustio. Before B. C. 70. (See Ver. Act. 2.53. Never published, according to Pseud-Ascon. in 53.) In Q. Caecilium B. C. 70. [VERRES.] In VerrB. C. 70. [VERRES.] In Verrem Actio prima 5th August, B. C. 70. [VERRES.] In Verrem Actio secunda. Not delivered. [VERRES.] * Pro M. Fonteio B. C. 69. [FONTEIUS.] Pro A. Caecina B. C. 69, probably. [CAECINA.] ** Pro P. Oppio B. C. 67. [OPPIUS.] Pro Lege Manilia B. C.B. C. 70. [VERRES.] In Verrem Actio secunda. Not delivered. [VERRES.] * Pro M. Fonteio B. C. 69. [FONTEIUS.] Pro A. Caecina B. C. 69, probably. [CAECINA.] ** Pro P. Oppio B. C. 67. [OPPIUS.] Pro Lege Manilia B. C. 66. [MANILIUS.] ** Pro C. Fundanio B. C. 66. [FUNDANIUS.] Pro A. Cluentio Avito B. C. 66. [CLUENTIUS.] ** Pro C. Manilio B. C. 65. [MANILIUS.] Pro L. Corvino, B. C. 65. (See Q. Cic. de petit cons. 5.) ** Pro C. Cornelio. Two orations B. C.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), P. Clodius Pulcher (search)
P. Clodius Pulcher 40. P. Clodius Pulcher, was the youngest son of No. 35. The form of the name Clodius was not peculiar to him : it is occasionally found in the case of others of the gens (Orelli, Inscript. 579); and Clodius was himself sometimes called Claudius. (D. C. 35.14.) He first makes his appearance in history in B. C. 70, serving with his brother Appius under his brother-in-law, L. Lucullus, in Asia. Displeased at not being treated by Lucullus with the distinction he had expected, he encouraged the soldiers to mutiny. He then left Lucullus, and betook himself to his other brother-in-law, Q. Marcius Rex, at that time proconsul in Cilicia, and was entrusted by him with the command of the fleet. He fell into the hands of the pirates, who however dismissed him without ransom, through fear of Pompey. He next went to Antiocheia, and joined the Syrians in making war on the Arabians. Here again he excited some of the soldiers to mutiny, and nearly lost his life. He now returned to R
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