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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 51 51 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 74 BC or search for 74 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 5 (search)
Bithyniae: this territory had been bequeathed to the Roman republic by Nicomedes III, B.C. 74. Ariobarzanis: king of Cappadocia, which had been overrun by Mithridates. Lucullum: Lucullus was related to both branches of the family of Metellus, and had married Clodia, sister of the notorious Publius Clodius. It was chiefly this mischievous demagogue, who was serving as one of his officers, that stirred up the dissensions and mutinies which robbed Lucullus of the fruits of his victories. discedere, is on the point of withdrawing. huic qui successerit, his successor, Glabrio. non satis paratum, not adequately furnished—an understatement: Glabrio had shown himself thoroughly incompetent, but Cicero was on good terms with him. This was the Glabrio who had presided over the court in the case of Verres. socus, i.e. Asiatics. civibus, Romans engaged in business in Asia. imperatorem (in pred. appos. with unum), as commander.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 20 (search)
potest (emphatic position), etc., it may be said, i.e. in answer to the preceding arguments: of course, in order to justify the wisdom of so exceptional a measure as the Manilian Law, it was necessary to show that the war was of sufficient gravity to require the appointment of Pompey. Observe the skillful transition from the genus of the war to its magnitudo. belli genus, i.e. the war, in its character. elaborandum est: use the personal construction in translating. ornatas, equipped; instructas, organised. obsessam, invested; oppugnatam, attacked (by the active operations of siege): the verb besiege includes both ideas. This was B.C. 74.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 26 (search)
tamen, i.e. though the defeat was so disastrous. potuisset: subj. of characteristic; the cont. to fact idea which is also contained in the word would not have required the subj.; § 522, a (311, c); B. 304,3; G. 597, a.3, a; H. 583 (511, I, N.1); H-B. 582, 3,a. vestro jussu, i.e. by the Gabinian Law (see Introd., p. 66). imperi: the military imperium could be extended after the term of office by the Senate. The holder of a command thus extended (prorogatum) was called proconsul or propraetor. In this case Lucullus had now held command seven years, from B.C. 74. conjungant, etc.: this sums up the considerations already urged as to the magnitude of the war (from sect. 23). integrae, fresh (cf. p.76, ll.20, 21).