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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 36 36 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, Mithridatic Wars (ed. Horace White), CHAPTER X (search)
rned home he sent ambassadors to Rome to sign the agreements. At the same time Ariobarzanes, either of his own notion or at the prompting of others, sent thither to complain that Cappadocia had not been delivered up to him, but that a greater part of it was yet retained by Mithridates. Sulla commanded Mithridates to give up Cappadocia. He did so, and then sent another embassy to sign the agreements. But now Sulla had just Y.R. 676 died, and as the Senate was otherwise occupied the prætors B.C. 78 did not admit them. So Mithridates persuaded his son-in-law, Tigranes, to make an incursion into Cappadocia as though it were on his own account. This artifice did not deceive the Romans. The Armenian king threw, as it were, a drag net around Cappadocia and made a haul of about 300,000 people, whom he carried off to his own country and settled them, with others, in a certain place where he had first assumed the diadem of Armenia and which he had called after himself, Tigranocerta, or the city
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER XII (search)
ted to him and still formidable to his opponents, all of whom rested upon Sulla's safety their hopes of impunity for what they had done in coöperation with him. But I think that he was satiated with war, with power, with city affairs, and that he took to rural life finally because he loved it. Sulla was fifty-nine years of age when he retired and he died in the following year. Y.R. 676 Directly after his retirement the Romans, although B.C. 78 delivered from slaughter and tyranny, began gradually to fan the flames of new seditions. Quintus Catulus and Æmilius Lepidus were chosen consuls, the former of the Sullan faction and the latter of the opposite party. They hated each other bitterly and began to quarrel immediately, from which it was plain that fresh troubles were brewing. While he was living in the country Sulla had a dream in which he thought he saw his Genius already calling him. So
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK V. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 33.—TROAS AND THE ADJOINING NATIONS. (search)
nion with the SimoisThe modern Gumbrek., and forms the PalæscamanderOr "ancient Scamander.", which was formerly a lake. The other rivers, rendered famous by Homer, namely, the Rhesus, the Heptaporus, the Caresus, and the Rhodius, have left no vestiges of their existence. The GranicusNow known as the Koja-Chai; memorable as the scene of the three great victories by which Alexander the Great overthrew the Persian empire, B.C. 334. Here also a victory was gained by Lucullus over Mithridates, B.C. 78., taking a different route, flows into the PropontisOr Sea of Marmora.. The small city of Scamandria, however, still exists, and, at a distance of a mile and a half from its harbour, IliumIt is not exactly known whether New Ilium was built on the same site as the Ilium or Troy which had been destroyed by the Greeks; but it has been considered improbable that the exploits mentioned in the Iliad should have happened in so short a space as that lying between the later Ilium and the coast. The
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War, The Life of Caius Julius Caesar. (search)
ibing his captor. His friends interceded for him, pleading his youth, and finally obtained hispardon, Sulla saying, " Take him, since you will have it so; but I would have you know that the youth for whom you are so earnest, will one day overthrow the aristocracy. I see in him many Mariuses." Caesar thinking it safer to leave Italy for a time went to Asia Minor, where he gained some military experience and distinguished himself for valor by saving a comrade's life. Sulla died in 78 and Caesar returned to his family and resumed his studies. He was a diligent and thorough student and doubtless followed the usual course of Greek, rhetoric, grammar, philosophy, and oratory. To be a good speaker was essential to political success, and Caesar was especially anxious to excel in that direction. He gave some public exhibitions of his skill and won much applause; but anxious to perfect himself still farther he went to Rhodes in 76, to study under Apollonius Molon, the most famous
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 68 (search)
dubitare quin, hesitate. The usual construction in this sense would be with the infin.; § 558, a, N.1 (332,g, N.2); B. 298, b; G. 555, R3; 14.596, I (505, i); cf. H.-B. 502, 3, b, 586. auctoritatibus, i.e. the opinions of influential men (cf. auctor in the next line). est vobis auctor, you have as authority. P. Servilius (Vatia Isauricus) was one of the most reputable men of the time. He held the proconsulship of Cilicia, B.C. 78-75, in which he gained great successes over the pirates. It was probably his intimate knowledge of the region and the kind of warfare, that led him to support this vigorous measure. debeat: for tense, see § 435, a (287, a); Cf. B. 268, 1; H-B. 481. Curio: see note on Impeachment of Verres, sect. 18, p. 34, l. 29. Lentulus: Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Clodianus, cos. B.C. 72; not to be confounded with Lentulus Sura, ens. B.C. 71, the accomplice of Catiline. Cassius: for the character of this family, see note on Verr. 1, sect. 30, p. 39, l. 3
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 10 (search)
ions the Civil War broke out afresh. The victory of Cinna later recalled Marius from exile. lumina: among these were Octavius; C. Caesar (see above) and his brother Lucius; Q. Catulus, father of the opponent of the Manilian Law (see below); M. Antonius, the great orator; and the pontifex maximus, Q. Scaevola. ultus est: to preserve the emphasis, render the cruelty, etc., was avenged by Sulla. dissensit, there was a quarrel between, etc. M. Lepidus, father of the triumvir, was consul B.C. 78 (after Sulla's death), with Q. Catulus, son of the one murdered by Cinna. The scheme of Lepidus to revive the Marian party resulted in a short civil war, in which he was defeated by his colleague and killed. ipsias: he was the victim of his own violence, and therefore less regretted. Cicero asks for no reward except the memory of this day. He relies on the devotion of the citizens, and has no fears for the future. The assembly dismissed. tamen: i.e. though these disturbances cost a
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BASILICA AEMILIA BASILICA PAULI (search)
equal responsibility in its construction, notwithstanding Livy's statement, a hypothesis that is supported by references to the later history of the basilica. In 78 B.C., the consul M. Aemilius Lepidus decorated the building (here called basilica Aemilia) with engraved shields or portraits of his ancestors (Plin. NHxxxv. 13), and passage) and the Argiletum. There are some remains, including a column base which probably belongs to the earliest period of the basilica, of the structures of 179, 78, and 34 B.C. (TF 66-75), or of 78 and 54 B.C. (JRS 1922, 29-31), but it is clear that little change was made in the extent and plan of the basilica in the rebuildin78 and 54 B.C. (JRS 1922, 29-31), but it is clear that little change was made in the extent and plan of the basilica in the rebuildings of 14 B.C. and 22 A.D. It consisted of a main hall, divided into a nave and two aisles by two orders of columns of africano marble, respectively 0.85 metre and 0.55 metre in diameter, with bases and capitals 1 In Zeitschr. f. Gesch. d. Archit. viii. (1924), 73, objection is taken to the proposed restoration of
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CLOACA MAXIMA (search)
h and 3.20 wide. Eight branches empty into this section-none of them, as Lanciani notes, from private houses, which must have relied largely on cesspools. Beneath the nave of the basilica Aemilia the channel of the cloaca Maxima has been found crossing it obliquely; this portion had been rebuilt in tufa and travertine in 34 A.D. Originally it appears to have run in the direction of the column of Phocas (TF fig. 10, p. 69), though it must soon have turned westward; but a branch was built (in 78 B.C., as Frank thinks-but did the cloaca at that time already run round the outside of the basilica ?) to connect it with the line of the cloaca as rebuilt (by Agrippa ?), which skirted the basilica on the north-west and south-west, then turned at right angles to the south-west near the shrine of Venus Cloacina, crossed the area of the forum, passed under the east end of the basilica Iulia, and thence into the Velabrum. According to Ficoroni (Roma Antica, i. 74) the whole of this lower section w
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SATURNUS, AEDES (search)
nate as distinguished from the fiscus of the emperors, and was administered by praefecti generally instead of quaestors (Plin. Ep. x. 3. 1; for the inscriptions relating to the aerarium, see DE i. 300; and for occurrences of aerarium populi romani or Saturni, Thes. ling. Lat. i. 1055-1058). It is probable that only the money itself was kept in the temple, and that the offices of the treasury adjoined it, perhaps at the rear in the AREA SATURNI (q.v.), until the building of the Tabularium in 78 B.C., when some at least of the records were probably transferred thither. Other public documents were affixed to the outer walls of the temple and adjacent columns (Cass. Dio xlv. 17. 3; CIL ia. 587, col. 2, 1. 40; Varro, LL v. 42). On the gable of the temple were statues of Tritons with horses (Macrob. i. 8. 4), and in the cella was a statue of Saturn, filled with oil and bound in wool (Plin. NH xv. 32; Macrob. i. 8. 5; Rosch. iv. 431), which was carried in triumphal processions (Dionys. vii.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TABULARIUM (search)
TABULARIUM a repository for state archives, probably in large part those belonging to the aerarium in the neighbouring temple of Saturn, that was built by Q. Lutatius Catulus in 78 B.C. on the south-east slope of the Capitoline. Before its construction the tameie=on a)gorano/mwn was used for the purpose of preserving the state records (see ATRIUM PUBLICUM). It is not mentioned in literature, but its identification is based on two inscriptions, one copied by Signorili and Poggio (CIL i. 737=vi. 1314): Q . Lutatius . Q . f . Q . n . Catulus . cos. substructionem et tabularium . de . s . s . faciundum . coeravit . eidemque . probavit; and the other still partially preserved in one of the rooms of the building (CIL i². 736 =vi. 1133=31597): Q . Lu]tatius . Q . f . Q . n . C[atulus . cos . de . s]en . sent . faciundu[m . coeravit.] eidemque . prob[avit]. The second story seems to have been added, or at least rebuilt, about the end of the first century (see below), but nothing else
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