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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 36 36 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 78 BC or search for 78 BC in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BASILICA AEMILIA BASILICA PAULI (search)
equal responsibility in its construction, notwithstanding Livy's statement, a hypothesis that is supported by references to the later history of the basilica. In 78 B.C., the consul M. Aemilius Lepidus decorated the building (here called basilica Aemilia) with engraved shields or portraits of his ancestors (Plin. NHxxxv. 13), and passage) and the Argiletum. There are some remains, including a column base which probably belongs to the earliest period of the basilica, of the structures of 179, 78, and 34 B.C. (TF 66-75), or of 78 and 54 B.C. (JRS 1922, 29-31), but it is clear that little change was made in the extent and plan of the basilica in the rebuildin78 and 54 B.C. (JRS 1922, 29-31), but it is clear that little change was made in the extent and plan of the basilica in the rebuildings of 14 B.C. and 22 A.D. It consisted of a main hall, divided into a nave and two aisles by two orders of columns of africano marble, respectively 0.85 metre and 0.55 metre in diameter, with bases and capitals 1 In Zeitschr. f. Gesch. d. Archit. viii. (1924), 73, objection is taken to the proposed restoration of
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, CLOACA MAXIMA (search)
h and 3.20 wide. Eight branches empty into this section-none of them, as Lanciani notes, from private houses, which must have relied largely on cesspools. Beneath the nave of the basilica Aemilia the channel of the cloaca Maxima has been found crossing it obliquely; this portion had been rebuilt in tufa and travertine in 34 A.D. Originally it appears to have run in the direction of the column of Phocas (TF fig. 10, p. 69), though it must soon have turned westward; but a branch was built (in 78 B.C., as Frank thinks-but did the cloaca at that time already run round the outside of the basilica ?) to connect it with the line of the cloaca as rebuilt (by Agrippa ?), which skirted the basilica on the north-west and south-west, then turned at right angles to the south-west near the shrine of Venus Cloacina, crossed the area of the forum, passed under the east end of the basilica Iulia, and thence into the Velabrum. According to Ficoroni (Roma Antica, i. 74) the whole of this lower section w
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SATURNUS, AEDES (search)
nate as distinguished from the fiscus of the emperors, and was administered by praefecti generally instead of quaestors (Plin. Ep. x. 3. 1; for the inscriptions relating to the aerarium, see DE i. 300; and for occurrences of aerarium populi romani or Saturni, Thes. ling. Lat. i. 1055-1058). It is probable that only the money itself was kept in the temple, and that the offices of the treasury adjoined it, perhaps at the rear in the AREA SATURNI (q.v.), until the building of the Tabularium in 78 B.C., when some at least of the records were probably transferred thither. Other public documents were affixed to the outer walls of the temple and adjacent columns (Cass. Dio xlv. 17. 3; CIL ia. 587, col. 2, 1. 40; Varro, LL v. 42). On the gable of the temple were statues of Tritons with horses (Macrob. i. 8. 4), and in the cella was a statue of Saturn, filled with oil and bound in wool (Plin. NH xv. 32; Macrob. i. 8. 5; Rosch. iv. 431), which was carried in triumphal processions (Dionys. vii.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TABULARIUM (search)
TABULARIUM a repository for state archives, probably in large part those belonging to the aerarium in the neighbouring temple of Saturn, that was built by Q. Lutatius Catulus in 78 B.C. on the south-east slope of the Capitoline. Before its construction the tameie=on a)gorano/mwn was used for the purpose of preserving the state records (see ATRIUM PUBLICUM). It is not mentioned in literature, but its identification is based on two inscriptions, one copied by Signorili and Poggio (CIL i. 737=vi. 1314): Q . Lutatius . Q . f . Q . n . Catulus . cos. substructionem et tabularium . de . s . s . faciundum . coeravit . eidemque . probavit; and the other still partially preserved in one of the rooms of the building (CIL i². 736 =vi. 1133=31597): Q . Lu]tatius . Q . f . Q . n . C[atulus . cos . de . s]en . sent . faciundu[m . coeravit.] eidemque . prob[avit]. The second story seems to have been added, or at least rebuilt, about the end of the first century (see below), but nothing else
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
a.). Gateway in Palazzo Antonelli (?), 355. 83Capitoline Temple burnt, 299. 82-79Rule of Sulla: he extends the Pomerium, 393; work in Forum, 233: pavement of Clivus Capitolinus, 122: of Clivus Palatinus, 124: of Clivus Victoriae, 126: of Lacus Curtius, 31: of House of Vestals, 59: Rostra, 451, and equestrian statue near them, 500; restores Temple of Hercules Custos, 252: Temple of Hercules Sullanus, 256. 80Curia restored, 143. 78Tabularium, 506. Basilica Aemilia decorated and restored, 72. Branch of Cloaca Maxima, 127. 74Gradus Aurelii (?) (Tribunal Aurelium), 540. 69Capitoline Temple re-dedicated, 299. 63Statue on Capitol moved, 49. 62Cicero buys hbuse of Marcus Crassus, 175. Temple of Aesculapius frescoed and rebuilt soon after, 2. Pons Fabricius built, 400. 62-27Pons Cestius, 282, 399. 61(after). Arch of Pompey for victory over Mithradates, 43. 60(ca.). Platform of Temple of Aesculapius on Tiber island d