hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 36 36 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, Benjamin L. D'Ooge, M. Grant Daniell, Commentary on Caesar's Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Foreign Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero. You can also browse the collection for 78 BC or search for 78 BC in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Cicero's Family and Friends. (search)
part of 46 B.C. In December of the same year he married his rich ward PubliliaPlut. Cic. 41; Cic. Fam. 4.14.1 and 3. Cf. also Schmidt, Briefw. p. 268.; but Publilia could not conceal her chagrin at finding herself second to Tullia in his affection, and when she evinced joy a few months later at Tullia's death, Cicero sent her to her mother and could not be induced to receive her back into his favor. Att. 12.32.1. Tullia. 53. Tullia, Cicero's only daughter, was probably born in 79 or 78 B.C. In 66 B.C. she was betrothed to C. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, Att. 1.3.3. and married him sometime within the next three years. He died during the year of Cicero's exile. pro Sest. 68. In 56 B.C. Tullia married Furius Crassipes. Q. fr. 2.4.2. The match was regarded as a good one, but for reasons unknown to us Crassipes and Tullia were soon divorced. Her next matrimonial venture was with P. Cornelius Dolabella, Att. 6.6.1; Fam. 8.6.1. the Caesarian politician. Their married life proved t
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter V: ad Atticum 1.16 (search)
Calvum refers to Crassus. Calvus was apparently a nickname given to Crassus, perhaps because of his baldness. ex Nanneianis: if the reading is correct, a thrust at Crassus, understood by Atticus but unintelligible to us. arcessivit: sc. iudices. intercessit: i.e. gave security for the payment. summo discessu bonorum, notwithstanding the withdrawal of all honest men. quos fames magis quam fama commoveret, who were influenced more by hunger than by honor. Cf. Intr. 103. Catulus: consul in 78 B.C. Cf. Cic. de lege Manil. 51. bonorum omnium coniunctione: Cicero prided himself upon the reconciliation of the senators and knights which his consulship had brought about. Cf. Cic. in Cat. 4.15. si iudicium est, etc., if it can be called a trial when thirty, etc. non modo homines, verum etiam pecudes: a proverbial expression. Talnam, Plautum, and Spongiam: fictitious names given in derision of the low origin of the judges. ceteras huiusmodi quisquilias, the rest of the riff-raff of that
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero, Letter LXVII: ad familiares 9.15 (search)
aetus had deprecated Cicero's apparent purpose of retiring entirely from public life. urbane: sc. fecisti. magnam partem: an attributive accusative, and not the object of relinquere; the attributive accusatives magnam partem, maiorem partent, and maximam partem have acquired in colloquial Latin the force of adverbs, and we find them frequently used as such in Plautus (e.g. Plaut. M. G. 94, Plaut. Poen. 413, etc.) and in the Letters (e.g. Fam. 8.9.3). Catulum: Q. Lutatius Catulus, consul in 78 B.C. and one of the leaders of the aristocracy just after Sulla's legislation had put that party in power. narras, you talk to me of; cf. Ep. LXI.7n. mi: cf. mi, Ep. XCIII.2n. in puppi: cf. contraxi vela, Ep. V.2n. urgeo forum: this use of urgeo is perhaps found nowhere else. Cf., however, altum urgere, Hor. Od. 2.10.2. amatorem tuum : i.e. Caesarem. ponor ad scribendum: cf. legem conscripserunt, Ep. XV.7n. Those who had witnessed and signed a bill were said scribendo adfuisse. scito : see Ep