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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 47 47 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 2 2 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 2 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for 87 BC or search for 87 BC in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK IX., CHAPTER I. (search)
ding to some were cast into chamber-pots. The Romans, after their conquest, finding them governed by a democracy,Aratus, the Achæan general, 245 B. C., drove from Attica the Lacedæmonian garrisons, and restored liberty to the Athenians. maintained their independence and liberty. During the Mithridatic war, the king set over them such tyrants as he pleased. Aristio, who was the most powerful of these persons, oppressed the city; he was taken by Sylla, the Roman general, after a siege,B. C. 87. and put to death. The citizens were pardoned, and, to this time, the city enjoys liberty, and is respected by the Romans. Next to the Piræus is the demus Phalereis, on the succeeding line of coast, then Halimusii, Æxoneis, Alæeis, the Æxonici, Anagyrasii; then Theoris, Lampesis; Ægilieis, Anaphlystii, Azenieis; these extend as far as the promontory Sunium. Between the above-mentioned demi is a long promontory, Zoster,C. Halikes. the first after the Æxoneis; then another promontory af
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK X., CHAPTER V. (search)
f its harbour. It lies favourablyThucyd. i. 36. for those who are sailing from Italy and Greece to Asia. The general festival held there serves the purposes of commerce, and the Romans particularly frequented it even before the destruction of Corinth.Kai\ o(/te sunesth/kei h/ Ko/rnqos. The Athenians, after having taken the island, paid equal attention to the affairs both of religion and of commerce. But the generalsArchelaüs and Metrophanes. of Mithridates, and the tyrant,Aristion, B. C. 87. who had occasioned the detection of (Athens from the Romans), ravaged it entirely. The Romans received the island in a desolate state on the departure of the king to his own country; and it has continued in an impoverished condition to the present time.Pausanias, viii. 33, § 2, (writing in the time of Hadrian,) says of Delos, that with the exception of the persons who came from Athens, for the purpose of protecting the temple and to perform the Delian ceremonies, it was deserted. The At