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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 876 BC or search for 876 BC in all documents.

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er of the Median empire, according to the account of Ctesias (ap. Diod. 2.24, &c., 32). He is said to have taken Nineveh in conjunction with Belesis, the Babylonian, and to have destroyed the old Assyrian empire under the reign of Sardanapalus, B. C. 876. Ctesias assigns 28 years to the reign of Arbaces, B. C. 876-848, and makes his dynasty consist of eight kings. This account differs from that of Herodotus, who makes Deioces the first king of Media, and assigns only four kings to his dynasty. ian, and to have destroyed the old Assyrian empire under the reign of Sardanapalus, B. C. 876. Ctesias assigns 28 years to the reign of Arbaces, B. C. 876-848, and makes his dynasty consist of eight kings. This account differs from that of Herodotus, who makes Deioces the first king of Media, and assigns only four kings to his dynasty. [DEIOCES.] Ctesias' account of the overthrow of the Assyrian empire by Arbaces is followed by Velleius Paterculus (1.6), Justin (1.3), and Strabo. (xvi. p. 737.)
he city. The account of Ctesias has been given at some length in Diodorus Siculus (2.23-27), and his statements respecting the Assyrian monarchy were followed by most subsequent writers and chronologists. (Comp. Justin, 1.1-3; Athen. xii. pp. 529, 530.) Justin places the death of Sardanapalus in the first half of the ninth century before the Christian aera, and according to his chronology Ninus therefore falls in the twenty-second century. Clinton gives B. C. 2182 for the commencement, and B. C. 876 for the close of the Assyrian empire. Owing to the detailed accounts in Diodorus, many modern writers have repeated his history with full confidence, though they have been not a little puzzled to reconcile it with the conflicting statements of other authorities. But the whole narrative of Ctesias is purely mythical, and cannot for one moment be received as a genuine history. Ctesias, it must be recollected, is the only authority on which the whole rests, and as he lived at the beginning