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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 33 33 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 1 1 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White), THE CIVIL WARS, CHAPTER V (search)
chus for a colleague, with whose coöperation he brought forward other measures in favor of the Italians. When they were both killed, as I have previously related, the Italians were still more excited. They could not bear to be considered subjects instead of equals, or to think that Flaccus and Gracchus should suffer such calamities while working for their political advantage. Y.R. 663 After them the tribune Livius Drusus, a man of most B.C. 91 illustrious birth, promised the Italians, at their urgent request, that he would bring forward a new law to give them citizenship. They desired this especially because by that one step they would become rulers instead of subjects. In order to conciliate the plebeians to this measure he led out to Italy and Sicily several colonies which had been voted some time before, but not yet planted. He endeavored to bring to an agreement the Senate and the eques
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK V., CHAPTER IV. (search)
to, the banks of the Trigno and Biferno, the district of Larino, the left bank of the Fortore, and extended north-west towards Pescara. a Samnitic nation possessing the hill-country, and extending almost to the sea. All these nations are small, but extremely brave, and have frequently given the Romans proofs of their valour, first as enemies, afterwards as allies; and finally, having demanded the liberty and rights of citizens, and being denied, they revolted and kindled the Marsian war.91 B. C. They decreed that Corfinium,Pentima near Popoli. the metropolis of the Peligni, should be the capital for all the Italians instead of Rome: made it their place d'armes, and new-named it Italica. Then, having convoked deputies from all the people friendly to their design, they created consulsThe first consuls were Q. Pompædius Silo, and C. Aponius Mutilus; the prætors were Herius Asinius for the Marucini, C. Veltius Cato for the Marsi, M. Lamponius and T. Cleptius for the Leucani,
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER I. (search)
yield, about the year 398 B. C. The insulting tyrant sentenced the heroic Phyton, who had commanded the town, to a cruel death, and removed the few inhabitants that remained to Sicily. but his son (Dionysius the younger) partly restored it,B. C. 360. and called it Phœbia. During the war with Pyrrhus, a body of Campanians destroyed most of the citizens against the faith of treaties,B. C. 280. and a little before the Marsic or social war, earthquakes destroyed most of the towns;B.C. 91. but after Augustus Cæsar had driven Sextus Pompeius out of Sicily, when he saw that the city was deficient of inhabitants, he appointed certain of those who accompanied the expedition to reside there, and it is now tolerably well peopled.The defeat of Sextus Pompeins is referred to the year 36 B. C., but there is no precise date mentioned for the establishment of the veteran soldiers in Rhegium, which probably took place about the year 31 B. C. Sailing 50 stadia from Rhegium towards th
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VI., CHAPTER IV. (search)
ce, there were two princes of the Seleucidæ, Antiochus Asiaticus and his brother Seleucus-Cybiosactes, who had an hereditary right to the throne; the latter however died about 54 B. C., and in him terminated the race of the Seleucidæ. the Paphlagonians,The race of the kings of Paphlagonia became extinct about 7 B. C. See M. l' Abbé Belley, Diss. sur l' ère de Germanicopolis, &c. Ac. des Inscr. et Belles-Lettres, vol. xxx. Mém. p. 331. Cappadocians,The royal race of Cappadocia failed about 91 B. C. and Egyptians,The race of the Lagidæ terminated with Ptolemy Auletes, who died 44 B. C., leaving two daughters, Cleopatra and Arsinoë. Ptolemy Apion died 96 B. C.; he left Cyrene, whereof he was king, to the Roman people [or] when they revolted and were subsequently deposed, as it happened in the case of Mithridates Eupator, and Cleopatra of Egypt, the whole of their territories within the PhasisNow the Fasz or Rion. and the Euphrates,The Forat, Ferat, or Frat. with the exception of
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Chapter 1 (search)
rt if anybody could have done it. fuisse, sc. commercium. referri, be entered, has for subject pretio . . . abalienasse. rebus istis, things of that sort. apud illos, i.e. the Greeks generally. The cities referred to in this section were all centres of Greek art or celebrated for the possession of some masterpiece. Reginos: Rhegium, Reggio, was a very ancient Greek city at the point of Italy nearest Sicily. It was a colony of Chalcis, probably founded in the eighth century B.C., and became a Roman municipium after the Social War, B.C. 91-90. merere velle, would take. illa, that famous. Tarentinos: Tarentum was the largest Greek city in Italy, a colony of Sparta, founded in the eighth century B.C., subjugated by Rome just after the invasion of Pyrrhus, B.C. 272. Cnidios . . . Coos: observe the chiasm. buculam: the celebrated bronze cow of Myron. longum est, it would be tedious: § 522, a (311, c) ; B. 304, 3 ; G. 254, R.1 ; H. 525, 2 (476,5); H.-B. 582, 3, b.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 62 (search)
he services of a magistrate after his term of office had expired, his imperium was extended (prorogatum) by the Senate, and was held by him pro consule or pro praetore, that is, as having the power of a consul or praetor while no longer actually a magistrate. It was not strictly legal to appoint a private citizen in such a capacity; but sometimes,— as in Pompey's case, —this was done. quidem, by the way. non nemo, a man or two. Philippus, a prominent member of the aristocracy (consul, B.C. 91), distinguished for his wit; a man of liberal temper, but a vehement partisan. pro consulibus, in place of both consuls. mittere: for mitto of the dir. disc. Philippus seems to have put his bon mot into the regular form of a sententia, or formal expression of opinion in the Senate, using the simple present tense, with the qualifying mea sententia; § 467(276,b); B. 259,2; G.227,N.2; H. 530(467, iii, 6); H.-B. 484. ut . . . fieret: subst. clause of result after the analogy of the subj.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 5 (search)
tunc, at that time. This was the long period of comparative quiet between the Gracchan disturbances (B.C. 133-121) and the tribunate of Drusus (B.C. 91), which was followed by the Social War and the civil wars of Marius and Sulla. Latio: not the geographical Latium merely, but all towns which at that time possessed Latin citizenship; that is, the Latin colonies, such as Venusia, the birthplace of the poet Horace. de ingeniis, i.e. could form some opinion about the talents of literary men. absentibus, people at a distance. Mario et Catulo (coss. B.C. 102); of these, Marius was renowned for his exploits, while Catulus was a good officer, and also a man of culture. nactus est, etc., he happened to find holding the consulship. eos, quorum alter, men of such a kind that one of them, etc. This would not only furnish him with themes for his poetry but insure appreciation of his genius. Luculli: Lucius, the one who fought against Mithridates, and his brother Marcus; both of them
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 6 (search)
Aemilio, i.e. M. Aemilius Scaurus (cos. B.C. 115), for many years princeps senatus. Catulo: see note on p. 156, l. 23. L. Crasso: the most distinguished orator of his time, a man of genius and culture (see Introd., ch. ii, p. xxxiv); he died B.C. 91. Drusum (M. Livius), tribune B.C. 91, a distinguished orator and statesman, who lost his life in a vain attempt to reconcile the aristocratic and democratic factions in the republic. Octavios: see Cat. 3, sect. 24. Catonem: probably the fathB.C. 91, a distinguished orator and statesman, who lost his life in a vain attempt to reconcile the aristocratic and democratic factions in the republic. Octavios: see Cat. 3, sect. 24. Catonem: probably the father of the famous Cato of Utica is meant. Hortensiorum: the most eminent of these was Q. Hortensius, the rival of Cicero and his opponent in the case of Verres. si qui forte, those (if there were any) who, etc. Heracliam: an important Greek city on the southern coast of Lucania. In the war with Pyrrhus it had fought on the side of the Romans, and B.C. 278 it entered into an alliance of the closest and most favorable character (aequissimo jure ac foedere).
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 16 (search)
ioned for investigation) was established. They are cited in support of Cicero's contention that in establishing such a tribunal in the present case Pompey was not pre-judging the innocence of Clodius and consequent guilt of Milo, but merely yielding to the necessities of the public situation. Catonis: M. Porcius Cato (the Younger); see note on Archias, sect. 22 (p. 164, l. 8). Drusus: M. Livius Drusus (;on of Marcus) was murdered by some unknown person on returning home from an exciting political debate (B.C. 91). Africano, i.e. Aemilianus. He was actively opposed to the plans of C. Gracchus for the division of the Latian lands; and, while the controversy was at its hottest, was found dead in his bed with marks (it was thought) of strangulation. His wife, sister of the tribune, and Gracchus himself lay under some suspicion of the crime, which was probably the act of Carbo (see note to sect. 8, p. 173, l. 27). quem immortalem, etc.: Scipio was murdered at the age of fifty-six.
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., chapter 6 (search)
l monarch against whom violence would be a virtue. A dictator, though his power was practically absolute, was not a tyrannus, since his office was held in accordance with the ancient laws of the commonwealth. quae is object and res is subject of patefecit. jam inde, ever since. contionem: see Introd. to notes on Manil. Law. declaravit, not by a formal vote, of course, but by spontaneous cries. optatissimi nuntii, etc., i.e. of Pansa's victory at Bononia. auxerit, added to my dignity. male mecum ageretur (a common Latin idiom),! should fare hard. parum . . . purgatus, i.e. if I needed any defence against so monstrous a charge. jejuno animo et angusto, i.e. mean and small-souled. id fecissem: § 592,3(341, d); B. 323; G. 628; H. 649, i (528, I); H.-B. 535, I, a; translate, to do as I had always done, [namely to] think, etc. campus, etc.: observe this ancient use of a figure still familiar to us. Crassus, the great orator, who died B.C. 91 (Introd., p. xxxvii).
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