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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 17 17 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 94 BC or search for 94 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ance of Alexander with a fleet and army, and Ptolemy was compelled to return to Cyprus. (B. C. 101.) Soon afterwards Alexander invaded Coele Syria, and renewed his attacks upon the independent cities. In B. C. 96 he took Gaza, destroyed the city, and massacred all the inhabitants. The result of these undertakings, and his having attached himself to the party of the Sadducees, drew upon him the hatred of the Pharisees, who were by far the more numerous party. He was attacked by the people in B. C. 94, while officiating as high-priest at the feast of Tabernacles; but the insurrection was put down, and six thousand of the insurgents slain. In the next year (B. C. 93) he made an expedition against Arabia, and made the Arabs of Gilead and the Moabites tributary. But in B. C. 92, in a campaign against Obedas, the emir of the Arabs of Gaulonitis, he fell into an ambush in the mountains of Gadara; his army was entirely destroyed, and he himself escaped with difficulty. The Pharisees seized the
Cae'lia or COE'LIA GENS, plebeian. In manuscripts the name is usually written Caelius, while on coins it generally occurs in the form of Coelius or Coilius, though we find on one coin L. Caelius Tax. (Eckhel, v. pp. 156, 175.) From the similarity of the names, Caelius is frequently confounded with Caecilius. The gens traced its origin to the Etruscan leader, Caeles Vibenna, in the time of the Roman kings, but no members of it obtained the higher offices of the state till the beginning of the first century B. C. : the first who obtained the consulship was C. Caelius Caldus in B. C. 94. There were only two family-names in this gens, CALDUS and RUFUS : the other cognomens are personal surnames, chiefly of freedmen. For those without a surname see CAELIUS.
After having endeavoured in vain to obtain the quaestorship (Cic. pro Planc. 21), he was elected in B. C. 107, tribune of the plebs. His tribuneship is remarkable for a lex tabellaria, which was directed against the legate C. Popillius, and which ordained that in the courts of justice the votes should be given by means of tablets in cases of high treason. Cicero (De Leg. 3.16) states, that Caldus regretted, throughout his life, having proposed this law, as it did injury to the republic. In B. C. 94, he was made consul, together with L. Domitius Ahenobarbus, in preference to a competitor of very high rank, though he himself was a novus homo : and after his consulship he obtained Spain as his province, as is usually inferred from coins of the gens Caelia which bear his name, the word His (pania) and the figure of a boar, which Eckhel refers to the town of Clunia. (One of these coins is figured in the Dict. of Ant. s. v. Epulones.) During the civil war between Marius and Sulla, B. C. 83,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Crassus, Clau'dius 26. L. Licinius Crassus Scipio, grandson of Crassus the orator [No. 23], one of whose daughters married his father P. Scipio Nasica, who was praetor, B. C. 94, His grandfather, having no son, adopted him by his testament, and made him heir to his property. (Cic. Brut. 58; Plin. Nat. 34.3. s. 8.)
rodotus, was, that the Medes made the Assyrians their subjects, except the district of Babylon. He means, as we learn from other writers, that the king of Babylon, who had before been in a state of doubtful subjection to Assyria, obtained complete independence as the reward for his share in the destruction of Nineveh. The league between Cyaxares and the king of Babylon is said by Polyhistor and Abydenus (ap. Euseb. Chron. Arm., and Syncell. p. 210b.) to have been cemented by the betrothal of Amyhis or Amytis, the daughter of Cyaxares, to Nabuchodrossar or Nabuchodonosor (Nebuchadnezzar), son of the king of Babylon. They have, however, by mistake put the name of Asdahages (Astyages) for that of Cyaxares. (Clinton, i. pp. 271, 279.) Cyaxares died after a reign of forty years (B. C. 94), and was succeeded by his son Astyages. (Hdt. 1.73, 74, 103-106, 4.11, 12, 7.20.) The Cyaxares of Diodorus (2.32) is Deioces. Cyaxares II. Respecting the supposed Cyaxares II. of Xenophon, see CYRUS. [P.S]
nd destroyed Ninus. [SARDANAPALUS.] The consequence of this war, according to Herodotus, was, that the Medes made the Assyrians their subjects, except the district of Babylon. He means, as we learn from other writers, that the king of Babylon, who had before been in a state of doubtful subjection to Assyria, obtained complete independence as the reward for his share in the destruction of Nineveh. The league between Cyaxares and the king of Babylon is said by Polyhistor and Abydenus (ap. Euseb. Chron. Arm., and Syncell. p. 210b.) to have been cemented by the betrothal of Amyhis or Amytis, the daughter of Cyaxares, to Nabuchodrossar or Nabuchodonosor (Nebuchadnezzar), son of the king of Babylon. They have, however, by mistake put the name of Asdahages (Astyages) for that of Cyaxares. (Clinton, i. pp. 271, 279.) Cyaxares died after a reign of forty years (B. C. 94), and was succeeded by his son Astyages. (Hdt. 1.73, 74, 103-106, 4.11, 12, 7.20.) The Cyaxares of Diodorus (2.32) is Deioces.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Deme'trius Eucaerus (search)
ria. (J. AJ 13.13.4.) His assistance was invoked by the Jews against the tyranny of Alexander Jannaeus; but though he defeated that prince in a pitched battle, he did not follow up his victory, but withdrew to Beroea. War immediately broke out between him and his brother Philip, and Straton, the governor of Beroea, who supported Philip, having obtained assistance from the Arabians and Parthians, blockaded Demetrius in his camp, until he was compelled by famine to surrender at discretion. He was sent as a prisoner to Mithridates, king of Parthia (Arsaces IX.), who detained him in an honourable captivity till his death. (J. AJ 13.14.) The coins of this prince are important as fixing the chronology of his reign; they bear dates from the year 218 to 224 of the era of the Seleucidae, i. e. B. C. 94-88. The surname Eucaerus is not found on these coins, some of which bear the titles Theos Philopator and Soter; others again Philometor Euergetes Callinicus. (Eckhel, iii. pp. 245-6.) [E.H.B]
Lici'nia 5. The daughter of L. Licinius Crassus the orator, consul B. C. 95, married P. Scipio Nasica, praetor B. C. 94, who was the son of P. Scipio Nasica, consul B. C. 111. Both she and her sister [No. 6] were distinguished for the purity and elegance with which they spoke the Latin language, an accomplishment which their mother Mucia, and their grandmother Laelia equally possessed. (Cic. Brut. 58.)
Menecles 2. Of Alabanda, a celebrated rhetorician, who lived shortly before the time of Cicero. He and his brother Hierocles taught rhetoric at Rhodes, where the orator M. Antonius heard them, about B. C. 94. They both belonged to the Asiatic or florid school of eloquence, which was distinguished more for pomp and elegance of diction, than for precision of thought. But the two brothers enjoyed extraordinary reputation, for Cicero says that they were imitated by all Asia. (Cic. Brut. 95, Orat. 69, de Orat. 2.23; Strab. xiv. p.661.) [L.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Metellus Scipio (search)
Metellus Scipio 22. Q. CAECIIIUS METELLUS PIUS SCIPIO, Q. F., the adopted son of Metellus Pius [No. 19]. He was the son of P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica, praetor B. C. 94, and Licinia, a daughter of the orator L. Crassus, and was a grandson of P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica, consul B. C. 111, and Caecilia, a daughter of Metellus Macedonicus. Through his grandmother he was therefore descended from the family of the Metelli, into which he was subsequently adopted. Before his adoption he bore the names of P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica, and hence his name is given in various forms. Sometimes he is called P. Scipio Nasica, sometimes Q. Metellus Scipio, and sometimes simply Scipio or Metellus. His full legal name, as it appears in a senatus consultum (Cic. Fam. 8.8), is the one given at the commencement of this notice. Appian erroneously gives him the praenomen Lucius. (B. C. 2.24.) Metellus is first mentioned in B. C. 63, when he is said to have come to Cicero by night, along with M. Crassus and M
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