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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 12 12 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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aw (Lex Domitia), by which the right of election was transferred from the priestly colleges to the people. (Dict. of Ant. pp. 773, b. 774, a.) The people afterwards elected him Pontifex Maximus out of gratitude. (Liv. Epit. 67; Cic. pro Deiot. 11; V. Max. 6.5.5.) He prosecuted in his tribunate and afterwards several of his private enemies, as Aemilius Scaurus and Junius Silanus. (Val. Max. l.c. ; Dio Cass. Fr. 100; Cic. Div. in Caecil. 20, Verr. 2.47, Cornel. 2, pro Scaur. 1.) He was consul B. C. 96 with C. Cassius, and censor B. C. 92, with Licinius Crassus, the orator. In his censorship he and his colleague shut up the schools of the Latin rhetoricians (Cic. de Orat. 3.24; Gel. 15.11), but this was the only thing in which they acted in concert. Their censorship was long celebrated for their disputes. Domitius was of a violent temper, and was moreover in favour of the ancient simplicity of living, while Crassus loved luxury and encouraged art. Among the many sayings recorded of both,
Ahenobarbus 5. L. DOMITIUS CN. F. CN. N. AHENOBARBUS, son of No. 3 and brother of No. 4, was praetor in Sicily, probably in B. C. 96, shortly after the Servile war, when slaves had been forbidden to carry arms. He ordered a slave to be crucified for killing a wild boar with a hunting spear. (Cic. Ver. 5.3; V. Max. 6.3.5.) He was consul in 94. In the civil war between Marius and Sulla, he espoused the side of the latter, and was murdered at Rome, by order of the younger Marius, by the praetor Damasippus. (Appian, App. BC 1.88 ; Vell. 2.26; Oros. 5.20.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
pendent. The people of Ptolemais applied for aid to Ptolemy Lathyrus, then king of Cyprus, who came with an army of thirty thousand men. Alexander was defeated on the banks of the Jordan, and Ptolemy ravaged the country in the most barbarous manner. In B. C. 102, Cleopatra came to the assistance of Alexander with a fleet and army, and Ptolemy was compelled to return to Cyprus. (B. C. 101.) Soon afterwards Alexander invaded Coele Syria, and renewed his attacks upon the independent cities. In B. C. 96 he took Gaza, destroyed the city, and massacred all the inhabitants. The result of these undertakings, and his having attached himself to the party of the Sadducees, drew upon him the hatred of the Pharisees, who were by far the more numerous party. He was attacked by the people in B. C. 94, while officiating as high-priest at the feast of Tabernacles; but the insurrection was put down, and six thousand of the insurgents slain. In the next year (B. C. 93) he made an expedition against Arabi
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Anti'ochus Grypus (search)
princes of the royal family. In the first year of the struggle (B. C. 112), Antiochus Cyzicenus became master of almost the whole of Syria, but in the next year (B. C. 111), A. Grypus regained a considerable part of his dominions; and it was then agreed that the kingdom should be shared between them, A. Cyzicenus having Coele-Syria and Phoenicia, and A. Grypus the remainder of the provinces. This arrangement lasted, though with frequent wars between the two kings, till the death of Antiochus Grypus, who was assassinated by Heracleon in B. C. 96, after a reign of twenty-nine years. He left five sons, Seleucus, Philip, Antiochus Epiphanes, Demetrius Eucaerus, and Antiochus Dionysus. (Justin, 39.1-3; Liv. Epit. 60; Appian, App. Syr. 69; Joseph. Aniiq. 13.13; Athen. 12.540.) Many of the coins of Antiochus Grypus have the head of Antiochus on one side, and that of his mother Cleopatra on the other. The one annexed must have been struck after his mother's death. (Eckhel, iii. p. 238, &c.)
the dominions of his family. By his wife Laodice he had six children ; but they were all, with the exception of the youngest, killed by their mother, that she might obtain the government of the kingdom. After she had been put to death by the people on account of her cruelty, her youngest son succeeded to the crown. (Diod. l.c., Exc. xxiv. p. 626, ed. Wess.; Plb. 3.5, 32.20, 23, 33.12; Justin, 35.1, 37.1.) Ariara'thes Vi. The youngest son of the preceding, reigned about 34 years, B. C. 130-96. He was a child at his succession. He married Laodice, the sister of Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, and was put to death by Mithridates by means of Gordius. (Justin, 37.1, 38.1; Memnon, apud Phot. Cod. 224, p. 230a. 41, ed. Bekker.) On his death the kingdom was seized by Nicomedes, king of Bithynia, who married Laodice, the widow of the late king. But Nicomedes was coon expelled by Mithridates, who placed upon the throne, Ariara'thes Vii. A son of Ariarathes VI. He was, however, al
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ariara'thes Vi. The youngest son of the preceding, reigned about 34 years, B. C. 130-96. He was a child at his succession. He married Laodice, the sister of Mithridates Eupator, king of Pontus, and was put to death by Mithridates by means of Gordius. (Justin, 37.1, 38.1; Memnon, apud Phot. Cod. 224, p. 230a. 41, ed. Bekker.) On his death the kingdom was seized by Nicomedes, king of Bithynia, who married Laodice, the widow of the late king. But Nicomedes was coon expelled by Mithridates, who placed upon the throne,
Go'rdius a Cappadocian by birth, the instrument of Mithridates Eupator VI. in his attempts to annex Cappadocia to Pontus. Gordius was employed by him, in B. C. 96, to murder Ariarathes VI. king of Cappadocia [ARIARATHES, No. 6]. He was afterwards tutor of a son of Mithridates. whom, after the murder of Ariarathes VII. he made king of Cappadocia. Gordius was sent as the envoy of Mithridates to Rome, and afterwards employed by him to engage Tigranes, king of Armenia, to attack Cappadocia, and expel Ariobarzanes I., whom the Romans made king of that country in B. C. 93. Sulla restored Ariobarzanes in the following year, and drove Gordius out of Cappadocia. Gordius was opposed to Muraena on the banks of the Halys, B. C. 83-2. (Justin, 38.1-3; App. Mith. 66; Plut. Sull. 5.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Longi'nus, Ca'ssius 7. C. Cassius Longinus, L. F. Q. N., brother of No. 6, was consul B. C. 96, with Cn. Domitius Ahenobarbus. He is mentioned by Cicero as one of those persons who were elected consuls notwithstanding their having failed to obtain the aedileship. (Cic. pro Planc. 21.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Nicome'des or Nicome'des Epiphanes (search)
f aggrandizement presented itself, and we find him uniting with Mithridates VI. (apparently about B. C. 102) in the conquest of Paphlagonia, the throne of which had been left vacant by the death of Pylaemenes. The Roman senate, indeed, quickly ordered the two kings to restore their new acquisition, but Nicomedes merely transferred the crown to one of his own sons, who had taken the name of Pylaemenes, and whom lie pretended to regard as the rightful heir. (Just. 37.4.) Not long after (about B. C. 96, see Clinton, vol. iii. p. 436), an opportunity seemed to offer itself of annexing Cappadocia also to his dominions, Laodice, the widow of Ariarathes VI., having thrown herself upon his protection in order to defend herself and her sons from the designs of Mithridates. Nicomedes (though he can hardly have been less than eighty years of age at this time) married Laodice, and established her in the possession of Cappadocia, from which, however, she was quickly again expelled by Mithridates. A
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ptolemaeus Apion (*Ptolemai=os *)Api/wn) king of Cyrene, was an illegitimate son of Ptolemy Physcon, king of Egypt, by his mistress Eirene. His father left him by his will the kingdom of the Cyrenaica, to which he appears to have succeeded without opposition, on the death of Physcon, B. C. 117. We know nothing of the events of his reign, but at his death in B. C. 96, he bequeathed his kingdom by his will to the Roman people. The senate, however, refused to accept the legacy, and declared the cities of the Cyrenaica free. They were not reduced to the condition of a province till near thirty years afterwards; a circumstance which has given rise to much confusion, some of the later Roman writers having considered this latter date to be that of the death of Apion, and the accompanying bequest. Hence Sextus Rufus, Ammianus, and Hieronvmus were led to suppose that there were two kings of the name of Apion, an error in which they have been followed by Scaliger, Freinshemius, and other modern
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