Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for March, 1 AD or search for March, 1 AD in all documents.

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[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.]the snow in the Southwest. Lynchburg, Va. Jan. 3. --The train on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad that left Bristol Sunday morning has arrived here, and the road is now open its wholes length.--The snow is 36 inches deep at Wytheville.
Later from Europe.Arrival of the Australasian. New York, Jan. 3. --The steamship Australasian, from Liverpool on the 22d, arrived this morning. Her advices are one day later. She has about $750,000 in specie. The Pekin Treaty has been confirmed.--China pays France 60,000,000 francs. The Christian Churches are to be restored. The cross was restored to the Cathedral in Pekin, and the event was celebrated by a Te Deum. The Constitutional says that France will never suffer a return to an offensive policy by Austria, in Lombard. Commercial. Liverpool, Saturday, Dec. 22, --Cotton firm; reported sales to day of 12,000 bales. Breadstuffs have an upward tendency. Console 92 ¼@92. Money market slightly more stringent, with an active demand. The Paris Bourse is very depressed.
From Charleston. Charleston, Jan. 3. --A number of free negroes and slaves are engaged in erecting redoubts in the harbor. Benj. Mordecai yesterday gave the State $10,000. The steamer Nashville had much difficulty in getting out of the harbor yesterday, on account of the fog. The channel buoys have been removed. The operations in the telegraph office were restricted by the State authorities, for some hours prior to 10 o'clock P. M., Dec. 31st. In the Convention, to. Dunkin, from the Committee on Commercial Relations, presented a report. A communication was received from the Governor, in relation to the Assistant Treasurer of the United States. The Convention then went into secret session, it is supposed to consider the question of adjournment, and the appointment of delegates to the Southern Convention. [Second Dispatch.] Charleston, Jan. 3. --A large number of whites and negroes are employed in erecting redoubts along the coast.
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1861., [Electronic resource], Disbandment of an English Indian regiment. (search)
Congressional. Washington, Jan. 3. --Senate.--Mr. Bigler presented the Pennsylvania plan of compromise, based on Crittenden's proposition. Mr. Crittenden introduced his plan of adjustment; also, resolutions submitting it to the people. He made an eloquent speech on the subject. Mr. Baker, of Oregon, resumed and concluded his speech of yesterday. He argued to show that the Northern people did not desire to interfere with slavery. Mr. Benjamin interrupted him, and quoted Republican papers, which sustained the John Brown raid. Mr. Baker recommended Jackson's policy, and closed with a strong appeal for the Union. Mr. Douglas took the floor on Powell's resolutions, and said being compelled to vote for them gave him great pain, declaring as they did that no adjustment could restore peace.--He said that Congress never had legislated on slavery without danger to the country. He defended the Kansas-Nebraska act, and defended the South from the aspersions o
From Washington. Washington, Jan. 3. --It is reliably stated that President Buchanan considered the communication of the Commissioners from South Carolina to him insolent, and returned it, and that they started home this morning. [Second Dispatch] Washington, Jan. 3. --It is believed, from what is known here, that in the course of a few days the forts at Pensacola and Key West, Fort Morgan, in Alabama, the fort at Ship Island, near the mouth of Lake Borgne, with the arsenaJan. 3. --It is believed, from what is known here, that in the course of a few days the forts at Pensacola and Key West, Fort Morgan, in Alabama, the fort at Ship Island, near the mouth of Lake Borgne, with the arsenal at Baton Rouge, La., and Fort Johnson, on the Cape Fear river, N, C., will be seized and garrisoned by the troops of the respective States in which they are located. Senator Toombs received a dispatch to-day, saying that the forts in Georgia were seized by order of Gov. Brown. Private advices say that if any attempt be made to reinforce either the arsenal at Augusta, Ga., or to remove the arms, they will be at once seized. The South Carolina Commissioners considered the abrupt term
Florida Convention. Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 3. --A large number of delegates to the Convention have arrived. It is probable that Judge McGhee, of Madison, will be elected President of the Convention. Ten resolutions will be adopted, declaring the right to secede has been deliberately determined, and there remains nothing but an ordinance of secession to be adopted. Judge McIntosh, U. S. Judge, has resigned. [Second Dispatch] Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 3, --The Conventilutions will be adopted, declaring the right to secede has been deliberately determined, and there remains nothing but an ordinance of secession to be adopted. Judge McIntosh, U. S. Judge, has resigned. [Second Dispatch] Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 3, --The Convention met at noon. Col. Pettit was chosen temporary chairman. Prayer by Bishop Rutledge. The delegates were called and enrolled. No permanent organization was made, and the Convention adjourned until Saturday at noon.
Highly important from Georgia--U. S. Forts occupied. Charleston, Jan. 3 --The returns from Georgia indicate that the has gone largely for secession. Forts Pulaski and Jackson have been taken possession of by Georgia State troops, under instructions from the Governor of the State. But for this action on the part of the Governor, the Savannah papers state that there would have been a general uprising of the people.
From Norfolk. Norpole, Jan. 3. --Great excitement prevails here, in consequence of a report that four companies from Fortress Monroe are ordered to Charleston. Lieut, J. H. North, U. S. N., sent in his resignation to-day.
Union meeting in Petersburg. Petersburg, Va., Jan. 3. --Hon. Timothy Rives is, by request, addressing an overflowing audience at Phœnix Hall to-night, in favor of the Union. A large number of ladies are present. The applause is deafening, and great enthusiasm prevails.
Secession in North Carolina. Wilmington, N. C., Jan. 3. --The secession flag, with fifteen stars, was raised here to-day by a large and enthusiastic gathering of people. A secession meeting was held to-night at the theatre, which was densely crowded. The secession feeling is increasing daily.
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