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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
ding and opening to us the little collections in mineralogy and natural history, and a few interesting inscriptions and antiquities found on the site of the Temple of Jupiter. When this was finally over, the prior accompanied us a little way down the mountain, and left us full of gratitude for his kindness, and deeply impressed with the benevolent utility of this remarkable institution, and the still more remarkable exertions and sacrifices of the Augustine monks who conduct it. Last year ten of the monks and two servants were overwhelmed by an avalanche, while guiding some travellers to the hospice, and all perished. As we descended the mountain we went a little out of our way to see a bridge and an avalanche which exactly corresponded to the description of one in Strabo.— Note by Mr. Ticknor. September 27.—Between Brigg and Domo d'ossola, we have today crossed the Alps by the Simplon,—a most astonishing proof of the power of man . . . . It is impossible to give any idea of <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
ll enough. Mrs. T. has set up an opposition line of soirees every Thursday, which quite distances my humble Sunday Evening concerns, without, however, putting them down; and next Thursday she has invited a moderate fraction of her dear five hundred friends to come and dance it out with her. This, I think, would seem enough to any reasonable person; but on the intervening evenings we have generally been to some sort of a party, from a seven-o'clock sociable to a ball which does not begin till ten; and the daytimes are spent in listening to Miss Walsh, Miss Anna Walsh, second daughter of Mr. Robert Walsh, a charming singer, who passed the winter with Mrs. Ticknor. who keeps us in an atmosphere of melody during most of the hours we are awake. The long and the short of the matter is, that if you were here you would not know us for the humdrum people that have heretofore lived in Park Street and Tremont Street, except that you would find us just as glad to see you as ever. In the