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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 19 19 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 5 (search)
th a beginning of its own, and its own conclusion; but in process of time, as usually happens to such as undertake great things, I grew weary and went on slowly, it being a large subject, and a difficult thing to translate our history into a foreign, and to us unaccustomed language. However, some persons there were who desired to know our history, and so exhorted me to go on with it; and, above all the rest, Epaphroditus, This Epaphroditus was certainly alive in the third year of Trajan, A.D. 100. See the note on the First Book Against Apion, sect. 1. Who he was we do not know; for as to Epaphroditus, the freedman of Nero, and afterwards Domitian's secretary, who was put to death by Domitian in the 14th or 15th year of his reign, he could not be alive in the third of Trajan. a man who is a lover of all kind of learning, but is principally delighted with the knowledge of history, and this on account of his having been himself concerned in great affairs, and many turns of fortune, and h
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book II, section 277 (search)
est of all the Roman procurators of Judea, and the immediate occasion of the Jewish war, at the twelfth year of Nero, and the seventeenth of Agrippa, or A.D. 66, the history in the twenty books of Josephus's Antiquities ends, although Josephus did not finish these books till the thirteenth of Domitian, or A.D. 93, twenty-seven years afterward; as he did not finish their Appendix, containing an account of his own life, till Agrippa was dead, which happened in the third year of Trajan, or A. D. 100, as I have several times observed before. who succeeded him, demonstrate him to have been a most excellent person, upon the comparison; for the former did the greatest part of his rogueries in private, and with a sort of dissimulation; but Gessius did his unjust actions to the harm of the nation after a pompons manner; and as though he had been sent as an executioner to punish condemned malefactors, he omitted no sort of rapine, or of vexation; where the case was really pitiable, he was most
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK I, section 1 (search)
Rome; and I confess that I myself believed both those determinations, till I came to finish my notes upon these books, when I met with plain indications that they were written not at Rome, but in Judea, and this after the third of Trajan, or A.D. 100. I SUPPOSE that by my books of the Antiquity of the Jews, most excellent Epaphroditus, Take Dr. Hudson's note here, which as it justly contradicts the common opinion that Josephus either died under Domitian, or at least wrote nothing later than his days, so does it perfectly agree to my own determination, from Justus of Tiberias, that he wrote or finished his own Life after the third of Trajan, or A.D. 100. To which Noldius also agrees, de Herod, No. 383 [Epaphroditus]. "Since Florius Josephus," says Dr. Hudson, "wrote [or finished] his books of Antiquities on the thirteenth of Domitian, [A.D. 93,] and after that wrote the Memoirs of his own Life, as an appendix to the books of Antiquities, and at last his two books against Apion, and y
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, COSMUS AUG. LIB. A RATIONIBUS, DOMUS (search)
COSMUS AUG. LIB. A RATIONIBUS, DOMUS near S. Sabina, on the Aventine, where a lead pipe bearing his name was found in remains of a building of the early seeond century (CIL xv. 7443 ; LF 34; Merlin 319; Deseemet, Santa Sabina 3 sqq.). De Rossi (Bull. d. Inst. 1855, 48) believes that the house of Caecina Decius Maximus Basilius included a part of this house.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ROIUS HILARIO, DOMUS (search)
ROIUS HILARIO, DOMUS A lead pipe (of the time of Augustus or even earlier) bearing his name was found, with another bearing the name of Rubellia Bassa (of the beginning of the second century A.D.), under the crepido of the ancient road between the Circus and the Palatine (CIL xv. 7522, 7524). It is stated that the first pipe ran off towards the Palatine at right angles from the second (or, more probably, from another uninscribed pipe which ran parallel to it), and it may have supplied a house situated there (LA 447, syll. 159, 160 is more correct than BC 1877, 180; NS 1877, 204). For Rubellia Bassa see CIL xiv. 2610; Pros. iii. 137. 86.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TIBERIANA, DOMUS (search)
y guardrooms on the slope above vanished, in their turn, behind even more lofty vaults and arches, which united the palace above to the new Atrium Vestae below, which is of the same period. As a link to unite these two great structures, Hadrian also built the majestic ramp by which one still ascends to the Palatine' ; (AJA 1924, 398 and pl. x (III. 23) ; the plans in LF 29=LR 155 and ZA 193 are less correct). On the south-west side of the palace there are traces of work of the beginning of the second century A.D. (HJ 78, n. 96), especially in the vaulted chambers described in BC 1894, 95-100; NS 1896, 162; LR 148, and in the open fish pond above them. The domus Tiberiana is mentioned in Hist. Aug. Pius o ; Marcus 6; Verus 2, 6, as the residence of the emperors at that time (for the only evidence of reconstruction, see above), though by DOMUS COMMODIANA (Commodus 12) the DOMUS AUGUSTIANA (q.v.) is probably meant; and its library is spoken of by Fronto ad M. Caes. iv. 5, p. 68, Naber, an
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SESSORIUM (search)
wide and 20 high, with five open arches on each side and windows above, and resembled closely the so-called templum Sacrae Urbis of Vespasian both in construction and scheme of decoration. Constantine walled up the arches and added the apse at the east end, but the columns were not set up until the eighth century. North of the church are the remains of another hall of the Sessorium, consisting of the apse with external buttresses, added almost immediately after its construction, and the start of the nave, probably belonging to the time of Maxentius (Ill. 49). This hall was intact down to the sixteenth century and was erroneously called templum Veneris et Cupidinis (RA 147-152). In 1887 further remains of a building of about 100 A.D. were found on this spot (NS 1887, 70, 108; BC 1887, 100). For further description of the Sessorium, see LR 399; Ann. d. Inst. 1877, 371 ; Mon. L. i. 490-492; HJ 249-250; LS iii. 163-164; Arm. 795-800; Becker Top. 556-557; SR i. 248; HCh 243; BC 1925, 278.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ferox, Urseius a Roman jurist, who probably flourished between the time of Tiberius and Vespasian. He ought not to be confounded (as Panziroli has done, De claris Interpr. Juris. 38) with the Julius Ferox who was consul,A. D. 100, in the reign of Trajan (Plin. Ep. 2.11, 7.13), and who is mentioned in an ancient inscription (Gruter, vol. i. p. 349) as curator alvei et riparum Tiberis et cloacarum. The jurist Ferox was certainly anterior to the jurist Julianus, who, according to the Florentine Index to the Digest, wrote four books upon Urseius. Works In the Collatio Legum Mosaicarum et Romanarum (11.7), inserted in the collections of Antejustinian law, is an extract from Ulpian, citing a tenth book of Urseius; but what was the precise subject of his works has not been recorded, although it might perhaps be collected from an attentive examination of the extracts from Julianus ad Urseium, in the Digest. In Dig. 9. tit. 2. s. 27.1, Urseius is quoted by Ulpian as reporting an opinion
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
led tes brother of the emperor, though he had neither the same father nor the same mother, as being the son by a former husband of a former wife of the emperor's father. According to Heineccius, one Numius and Vibia were the parents of Numius Albius ; then, after the death of Numius the father, Petronius Didius and Vibia were the parents of Didius Proculus; then, after the death of Vibia, Petronius Didius and Aemilia Clara were the parepts of the emperor. Julianus was born about the year A. D. 100, after Trajan had become emperor. This is inferred from the date of his labours on the Edict, which according to Eusebius, were undertaken about A. D. 132, when he was probably praetor. At this period the leges annales were strictly observed, and the regular age for the praetorship was about thirty. (Plin. Ep. 7.30; Dio Cass. lii. p. 479.) He is the first jurist named in the Florentine Index to the Digest, though there are fragments in that work from nine jurists of earlier date, and, thou
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
rom the concluding lines, was written after the death of Domitian, that is, not earlier than A. D. 96. 3. The first satire, as we learn from the forty-ninth line, was written after the condemnation of Marius Priscus, that is, not earlier than A. D. 100. These positions admit of no doubt or cavil, and hence it is established that Juvenal was alive at least 17 years after the death of Paris, and that some of his most spirited productions were composed after the death of Domitian. Hence, if the turally conclude, the same person with the Paris named in the preceding sentence, it is impossible that Juvenal could have been banished later than A. D. 83; it is impossible that he could have died immediately afterwards, since he was alive in A. D. 100; and it is incredible that if he had pined for a long series of years at a distance from his country his works should contain no allusion to a destiny so sad, while, on the other hand, they bear the most evident marks of having been conceived a
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