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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 19 19 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 2 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 100 AD or search for 100 AD in all documents.

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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, COSMUS AUG. LIB. A RATIONIBUS, DOMUS (search)
COSMUS AUG. LIB. A RATIONIBUS, DOMUS near S. Sabina, on the Aventine, where a lead pipe bearing his name was found in remains of a building of the early seeond century (CIL xv. 7443 ; LF 34; Merlin 319; Deseemet, Santa Sabina 3 sqq.). De Rossi (Bull. d. Inst. 1855, 48) believes that the house of Caecina Decius Maximus Basilius included a part of this house.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ROIUS HILARIO, DOMUS (search)
ROIUS HILARIO, DOMUS A lead pipe (of the time of Augustus or even earlier) bearing his name was found, with another bearing the name of Rubellia Bassa (of the beginning of the second century A.D.), under the crepido of the ancient road between the Circus and the Palatine (CIL xv. 7522, 7524). It is stated that the first pipe ran off towards the Palatine at right angles from the second (or, more probably, from another uninscribed pipe which ran parallel to it), and it may have supplied a house situated there (LA 447, syll. 159, 160 is more correct than BC 1877, 180; NS 1877, 204). For Rubellia Bassa see CIL xiv. 2610; Pros. iii. 137. 86.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TIBERIANA, DOMUS (search)
y guardrooms on the slope above vanished, in their turn, behind even more lofty vaults and arches, which united the palace above to the new Atrium Vestae below, which is of the same period. As a link to unite these two great structures, Hadrian also built the majestic ramp by which one still ascends to the Palatine' ; (AJA 1924, 398 and pl. x (III. 23) ; the plans in LF 29=LR 155 and ZA 193 are less correct). On the south-west side of the palace there are traces of work of the beginning of the second century A.D. (HJ 78, n. 96), especially in the vaulted chambers described in BC 1894, 95-100; NS 1896, 162; LR 148, and in the open fish pond above them. The domus Tiberiana is mentioned in Hist. Aug. Pius o ; Marcus 6; Verus 2, 6, as the residence of the emperors at that time (for the only evidence of reconstruction, see above), though by DOMUS COMMODIANA (Commodus 12) the DOMUS AUGUSTIANA (q.v.) is probably meant; and its library is spoken of by Fronto ad M. Caes. iv. 5, p. 68, Naber, an
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SESSORIUM (search)
wide and 20 high, with five open arches on each side and windows above, and resembled closely the so-called templum Sacrae Urbis of Vespasian both in construction and scheme of decoration. Constantine walled up the arches and added the apse at the east end, but the columns were not set up until the eighth century. North of the church are the remains of another hall of the Sessorium, consisting of the apse with external buttresses, added almost immediately after its construction, and the start of the nave, probably belonging to the time of Maxentius (Ill. 49). This hall was intact down to the sixteenth century and was erroneously called templum Veneris et Cupidinis (RA 147-152). In 1887 further remains of a building of about 100 A.D. were found on this spot (NS 1887, 70, 108; BC 1887, 100). For further description of the Sessorium, see LR 399; Ann. d. Inst. 1877, 371 ; Mon. L. i. 490-492; HJ 249-250; LS iii. 163-164; Arm. 795-800; Becker Top. 556-557; SR i. 248; HCh 243; BC 1925, 278.