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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 10 10 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, BIBLIOTHECA TEMPLI D. AUGUSTI (search)
BIBLIOTHECA TEMPLI D. AUGUSTI also called bibliotheca Templi novi, the library established by Tiberius in the temple of Augustus, and dedicated after his death (Suet. Tib. 74; Plin. NH xxxiv. 43). This library was burned with the temple under Vespasian or Domitian and restored by the latter. From a reference in Martial (xii. 8), it has been conjectured that the books themselves were removed after this fire and not actually replaced until just before the publication of this epigram in 101 A.D. (Friedlander, ad loc.). It is possible that this is the same library that was called bibliotheca domus Tiberianae in the fourth century (cf. Boyd 10-15, 34). For the discussion of the identification of this library, see AUGUSTUS, TEMPLUM.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ARRUNTIUS STELLA, DOMUS (search)
ARRUNTIUS STELLA, DOMUS the house of the consul of 101 A.D., the friend of Statius and Martial, at the beginning of the Subura (Mart. xii. 3. 9; cf. Pros. i. p. 147, n. 947).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, POMPONII, DOMUS (search)
POMPONII, DOMUS on the Quirinal, near the temples of Salus and Quirinus. This house belonged to a certain Tampilus, and afterwards to T. Pomponius Atticus. It was old-fashioned in its appointments, but had a delightful garden (Cic. ad Att. iv. I. 4; xii. 45.3; de legg. i. I. 3; Nepos Att. 13). It continued in the possession of the Pomponii, for an inscription (CIL vi. 1492) found at the south-east corner of the Alta Semita and the clivus Salutis in 1558 (LS iii. 192) indicates that T. Pomponius Bassus, curator alimentorum under Trajan, lived here in 101 A.D. (RhM 1894, 398, 399; Pros. iii. 75. 530).
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, FORUM TRAIANI (search)
the travertine foundation. To secure the stability of the structure the chamber itself had afterward been filled up with concrete, certainly after 1764, in which year one Radet wrote his name on the lintel of the door (CR cit.). The entire surface of the shaft is covered with reliefs, arranged on a spiral band, which varies in width from about go centimetres at the bottom to nearly 1.25 metre at the top. These reliefs represent the principal events in the campaigns of Trajan in Dacia between 101 and 106 A.D., and also form a complete encyclopedia of the organisation and equipment of the Roman army in the second century. The average height of the figures is 60 centimetres, and they were cut after the column had been erected, so that the joints of the blocks are almost entirely concealed. These reliefs were also coloured most brilliantly (Bull. d. Inst. 1833, 92; 1836, 39-41). So PI. 289: but both statements are open to question. Casts of these reliefs may be seen in the Lateran Muse
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SUBURA (search)
i. 18. 2), dirty and wet (ib. v. 22. 5-9), a resort of harlots (Pers. 5. 32; Mart. ii. 17; vi. 66. 1-2; xi. 61. 3; 78. ii ; Priap. 40. I), of dealers in provisions and delicacies (Iuv. xi. 141; Mart. vii. 31; x. 94. 5-6) and finery (Mart. ix. 37), and of tradesmen of various sorts (praeco, CIL vi. 1953; crepidarius, ib. 9284; ferrarius, 9399; lanarius, 9491; inpilarius, 33862; lintearius, 9526). That there were also dwellings of more distinguished persons is shown by the fact that Caesar once lived here (Suet. Caes. 46) and L. Arruntius Stella, consul in 101 A.D. (Mart. xii. 3. 9; cf. xii. 21. 5). Of a probable late division into Subura maior and Subura minor, to be inferred from the reading of one inscription (CIL vi. 9526: Sebura maiore ad ninfas), nothing further is known. See also Jord. i. I. 185-186; HJ 330-332. For rulers and scribes of the Jewish synagogue of the Subura (a)/rxwn; grammateu\s *sibouphsi/wn), see CIG 6447; Mitt. 1886, 56; NS 1920, 147-151, 154; BC 1922, 208-212.
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TIBERIS (search)
(CIL vi. 31543), and set up other cippi, three of which remain (31544 a-c -- before 24 A.D.). From the reign of Claudius we have a cippus of the curatores who 'ripam cippis positis terminaverunt a Trigario ad pontem Agrippae' (31545), while under Vespasian and afterwards only a single curator is named, it being doubtful whether one functioned for the whole collegium, or whether henceforth there was only a single curator (31546-8 -- 73-74 A.D.). We have other cippi under Trajan (31549-51 -- 101 and 104 A.D. -- seventeen set up by Ti. Julius Ferox curator alvei Tiberis ... ct cloacarum urbis), Hadrian (31552 -- 121 A.D.), Antoninus Pius (31553-4 -- 161 A.D.), Septimius Severus (31555-197 -- 198). None of these later groups is very large; and then there is a gap till Diocletian (31556 -- 286-305 A.D.). See PONS AELIUS for the regulation of the channel there; and for the bridges, see PONS. For the termination and embankments in general, BC 1889, 165-172; 1893, 14-26; LR 9-13; Pl. 14-1
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Temple of Fortuna, 214; Ara of Pudicitia, 433; Naumachia, 358; rostra and plutei, 453-4; restores Circus Maximus, 117; builds Theatre in Campus Martius, 518; Amphitheatrum Castrense, 5; additions to Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6; Odeum restored, 371; Thermae Suranae, 532; Thermae of Trajan, 534; Arch, 47; Pantheon burnt, 383; extends Aqua Marcia to Aventine, 23, 26 extends Anio Novus, 12. 101Books replaced in Library of Temple of Augustus (?), 84. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 104Remains of the Domus Aurea damaged by fire, 170, 172.M Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 107(?) Pomerium extended, 393. 109(ca.). Aqua Trajana, 28. 112Basilica Ulpia completed, 241. 113Forum of Trajan dedicated, 237. 117-138Reign of Hadrian: he builds Temple of Trajan, 244; Temple of Matidia, 331; restores Temple of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85; restores shrine of Vesta
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
hly favoured by Nerva and his son Trajan. Pliny (Ep,. 6.5) mentions an altercation between him and Licinius Nepos, concerning the cause of Pomponius Rufus Varinus. Celsus was then praetor, and, as the leges annales were at that time religiously observed (Plin. Ep. 7.16), may be supposed to have been 34 years of age. This would give A. D. 67 for the year of the birth of Celsus, for the cause of Pomponius Rufus was pleaded when M. Acilius was consul-elect (Plin. Ep. 5.20), that is to say, in A. D. 101. Celsus was twice consul. The date of his first consulship is not recorded. The second occurred A. D. 129, when he had C. Neratius Marcellus for his colleague. (Dig. 5. tit. 3. s. 20.6.) He was a friend of Hadrian, and one of that emperor's council (Spartian. Hadrian. 100.18, where for Julius Celsus is to be read Juventius Celsus), and he probably died towards the end of Hadrian's reign, for Julianus, the jurist, in a fragment of a work (Digesta) which was written in the commencement of th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cornu'tus Tertullus was consul suffectus in A. D. 101 together with Pliny the Younger, who mentions him several times as a person of great merit. (Epist. 4.17, 5.15, 7.21, 31.) [L.S]
ubmitted to an unheard of degradation by consenting to pay an annual tribute. These occurrences are believed to have happened between the years A. D. 86-90, but both the order and the details of the different events are presented in a most confused and perplexing form by ancient authorities. Trajan soon after his accession determined to wipe out the stain contracted by his predecessor, and at once refused to fulfil the conditions of the league. Quitting the city in his fourth consulship (A. D. 101), he led an army in person against the Dacians, whom he defeated near Tapae, the scene of their former misfortune, after an obstinate struggle, in which both parties suffered severely. Pressing onwards, a second victory was gained by Lusius Quietus, commander of the Moorish cavalry, many strongholds were stormed, the spoils and trophies taken from Fuscus were recovered, and the capital, Sarmazegetusa (*Zermizegeqou/sa), was invested. Decebalus having in vain attempted to temporize, was at
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