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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 10 10 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 7 7 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
hly favoured by Nerva and his son Trajan. Pliny (Ep,. 6.5) mentions an altercation between him and Licinius Nepos, concerning the cause of Pomponius Rufus Varinus. Celsus was then praetor, and, as the leges annales were at that time religiously observed (Plin. Ep. 7.16), may be supposed to have been 34 years of age. This would give A. D. 67 for the year of the birth of Celsus, for the cause of Pomponius Rufus was pleaded when M. Acilius was consul-elect (Plin. Ep. 5.20), that is to say, in A. D. 101. Celsus was twice consul. The date of his first consulship is not recorded. The second occurred A. D. 129, when he had C. Neratius Marcellus for his colleague. (Dig. 5. tit. 3. s. 20.6.) He was a friend of Hadrian, and one of that emperor's council (Spartian. Hadrian. 100.18, where for Julius Celsus is to be read Juventius Celsus), and he probably died towards the end of Hadrian's reign, for Julianus, the jurist, in a fragment of a work (Digesta) which was written in the commencement of th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Cornu'tus Tertullus was consul suffectus in A. D. 101 together with Pliny the Younger, who mentions him several times as a person of great merit. (Epist. 4.17, 5.15, 7.21, 31.) [L.S]
ubmitted to an unheard of degradation by consenting to pay an annual tribute. These occurrences are believed to have happened between the years A. D. 86-90, but both the order and the details of the different events are presented in a most confused and perplexing form by ancient authorities. Trajan soon after his accession determined to wipe out the stain contracted by his predecessor, and at once refused to fulfil the conditions of the league. Quitting the city in his fourth consulship (A. D. 101), he led an army in person against the Dacians, whom he defeated near Tapae, the scene of their former misfortune, after an obstinate struggle, in which both parties suffered severely. Pressing onwards, a second victory was gained by Lusius Quietus, commander of the Moorish cavalry, many strongholds were stormed, the spoils and trophies taken from Fuscus were recovered, and the capital, Sarmazegetusa (*Zermizegeqou/sa), was invested. Decebalus having in vain attempted to temporize, was at
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
which, however, he afterwards retracted. (Anthol. Lat. 1.17, 20. 3.11, 112, 113, 114, 115, 265, 291, ed. Burmann, or n. 213-221, ed. Meyer ; Wernsdorf, Poet. Lat. Min. vol. iii. p. 425, vol. iv. pt. ii. p. 854.) Vergilius Poeta an Orator A curious fragment has been recently published from a Brussels MS. headed " PANNII FLORI (a corruption probably of P. ANNII) Virgilius Orator an Poeta, Incipit." The introduction only, which is in the form of a dialogue supposed to have been held about A. D. 101, has been preserved, and from this we learn that the author was a native of Africa, that he had repaired, when still almost a boy, to Rome, and had become a competitor, at the Ludi Capitolini celebrated by Domitian (A. D. 90 apparently), for the poetical prize, which had been awarded to him by the applauding shouts of the audience, but unfairly withheld by the emperor. We are farther informed that, disgusted by this disappointment, he had refused to return to his country and his kindred, h
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Hosti'lius Firmi'nus legatus of Marius Priscus, proconsul of the Roman province of Africa in Trajan's reign. He was involved in the charges brought against the proconsul A. D. 101 (comp. Juv. 1.49, 8.120) of extortion and cruelty; and, without being degraded from his rank as senator, he was prohibited the exercise of all senatorial functions. (Plin. Ep. 2.11, 12.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Macer, Bae'bius 1. One of the consuls suffecti A. D. 101, was consul designatus when the younger Pliny pleaded the cause of Bassus before the senate. (Plin. Ep. 4.9.16.) He was praefectus urbi at the time of Trajan's death, A. D. 117. (Spart. Hadr. 5.) Whether he or Calpurnius Macer is the Macer to whom Pliny addresses three of his letters (3.5, 5.18, 6.24), is uncertain.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ma'iximus, L. A'ppius a distinguished Roman general in the reigns of Domitian and Trajan. In A. D. 91 Maximus quelled the revolt of Antonius in Germany, and at the same time had the magnanimity to burn all the letters of the latter, that they might not expose others to the vengeance of Domitian. In A. D. 101 he fought with success under Trajan in the Dacian war against Decebalus. In A. D. 115 he was one of Trajan's generals in the Parthian war; but here his good fortune failed him, for he was defeated and perished in this year. We learn from the Fasti that he was consul in A. D. 103. (Dio Cass. Ixvii. 11, Ixviii. 9, 30 ) There is some doubt about the exact form of his name. Dio Cassius names him simply L. Maximus; but Domitian, in a letter contained among those of Pliny (10.66), and the Fasti call him L. Appius Maximus, which is the form we have adopted. But Martial (9.85), and Aurelius Victor (Epit. 11.10), give to the conqueror of Antonius the name of Appius Norbanus. These stateme
Orfitus 5. CORNELIUS SCIPIO ORFITUS, one of the consules suffecti A. D. 101.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Quie'tus, Q. Lu'sius was an independent Moorish chief, not belonging to the Roman province of Mauritania. He served, however, with a body of Moorish cavalry in the Roman army, but in consequence of some offence which he had committed, he was dismissed from the service with disgrace. At a later time, A. D. 101, when Trajan was going to carry on war against the Dacians, and was in want of Moorish cavalry, Quietus offered his services again of his own accord, and was received with welcome by the emperor. In this war, and still more in the Parthian war, which began in A. D. 114, Quietus gained great distinction, and became one of the favourite generals of Trajan. He took the towns of Nisibis and Edessa, and subdued the Jews, against whom he had been sent. Trajan made him governor of Judaea, and rewarded him still further by raising him to the consulship in A. D. 116 or 117. His name does not appear in the Fasti, and he must, therefore, have been only one of the consules suffecti for the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ear in which he received the consular honour. Some additions were made to the Panegyricus after it was pronounced (Plin. Ep. 3.13, 18). It was perhaps about this time that Hadrian, afterwards emperor, married Sabina, the grand-niece of Trajan; and to this date or somewhere about this time we may refer a letter of Plinius (Ep. 3.20), in which he says that all the senators on the day of electing the magistrates demanded the vote by ballot (tabellas postulaverunt). In his fourth cousulship, A. D. 101, Trajan left Rome for his campaign against the Daci. Decebalus, king of the Daci, had compelled Domitian to purchase peace by an annual payment of money; and Trajan, either being tired of paying this shameful tribute, or having other grounds of complaint, determined on hostilities. Decebalus was defeated, and one of his sisters was taken prisoner, and many of his strong posts were captured. Trajan advanced as far as Zermizegethusa, probably the chief town of the Dacian king, and Decebalus