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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 9 9 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 4 4 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, AUREA, DOMUS (search)
a groined cross vault; while another (84) is interesting as being octagonal in plan, with a circular dome having an opening in the centre. This room appears never to have been completed. The remains of this palace, which were damaged by fire in 104 A.D., were covered over and filled up by Trajan ((Ill. 16, in which the brick- work in the middle belongs to Nero, the finer brickwork with opus reticulatum, on the right, having been added by Trajan). The rough brickwork on the left is pre-Trajanic,d what the fire of Nero had spared, and Domitian was entirely oeeupied in rebuilding the imperial palaees. As we have seen it is unlikely that the vestibule had been destroyed as yet. Trajan had hardly completed Domitian's work when a fire in 104 A.D. destroyed the Golden House (Hier. a. Abr. 2120: Romae aurea domus incendio Conflagravit; ef. Orosius 7. 12) and hastened his intention of constructing his huge thermae (q.v.) on the site. A number of the openings of the domus Aurea were walled u
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TIBERIS (search)
31543), and set up other cippi, three of which remain (31544 a-c -- before 24 A.D.). From the reign of Claudius we have a cippus of the curatores who 'ripam cippis positis terminaverunt a Trigario ad pontem Agrippae' (31545), while under Vespasian and afterwards only a single curator is named, it being doubtful whether one functioned for the whole collegium, or whether henceforth there was only a single curator (31546-8 -- 73-74 A.D.). We have other cippi under Trajan (31549-51 -- 101 and 104 A.D. -- seventeen set up by Ti. Julius Ferox curator alvei Tiberis ... ct cloacarum urbis), Hadrian (31552 -- 121 A.D.), Antoninus Pius (31553-4 -- 161 A.D.), Septimius Severus (31555-197 -- 198). None of these later groups is very large; and then there is a gap till Diocletian (31556 -- 286-305 A.D.). See PONS AELIUS for the regulation of the channel there; and for the bridges, see PONS. For the termination and embankments in general, BC 1889, 165-172; 1893, 14-26; LR 9-13; Pl. 14-17, 75-77; P
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
i, 453-4; restores Circus Maximus, 117; builds Theatre in Campus Martius, 518; Amphitheatrum Castrense, 5; additions to Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6; Odeum restored, 371; Thermae Suranae, 532; Thermae of Trajan, 534; Arch, 47; Pantheon burnt, 383; extends Aqua Marcia to Aventine, 23, 26 extends Anio Novus, 12. 101Books replaced in Library of Temple of Augustus (?), 84. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 104Remains of the Domus Aurea damaged by fire, 170, 172.M Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 107(?) Pomerium extended, 393. 109(ca.). Aqua Trajana, 28. 112Basilica Ulpia completed, 241. 113Forum of Trajan dedicated, 237. 117-138Reign of Hadrian: he builds Temple of Trajan, 244; Temple of Matidia, 331; restores Temple of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85; restores shrine of Vesta, 59, and extends House of Vestals, 59; restores Temple of Divus Julius, 287; Mausole
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
A'tticus Hero'des, Tibe'rius Clau'dius> the most celebrated Greek rhetorician of the second century of the Christian era, was born about A. D. 104, at Marathon in Attica. He belonged to a very ancient family, which traced its origin to the fabulous Aeacidae. His father, whose name was likewise Atticus, discovered on his estate a hidden treasure, which at once made him one of the wealthiest men of his age. His son Atticus Herodes afterwards increased this wealth by marrying the rich Annia Regilla. Old Atticus left in his will a clause, according to which every Athenian citizen was to receive yearly one mina out of his property; but his son entered into a composition with the Athenians to pay them once for all five minas each. As Atticus, however, in paving the Athenians, deducted the debts which some citizens owed to his father, they were exasperated against him, and, notwithstanding the great benefits he conferred upon Athens, bore him a grudge as long as he lived. Atticus Herodes
en from Fuscus were recovered, and the capital, Sarmazegetusa (*Zermizegeqou/sa), was invested. Decebalus having in vain attempted to temporize, was at length compelled to repair to the presence of the prince, and to submit to the terms imposed by the conqueror, who demanded not only the restitution of all plunder, but the cession of a large extent of territory. Trajan then returned to Rome, celebrated a triumph, and assumed the title of Dacicus. The war having been, however, soon renewed (A. D. 104), he resolved upon the permanent occupation of the regions beyond the Danube, threw a bridge of stone across the river about six miles below the rapid, now known as the Iron Gates, and being thus enabled to maintain his communications with ease and certainty, succeeded, after encountering a desperate resistance, in subjugating the whole district, and reducing it to the form of a province. (A. D. 105.) Decebalus, having seen his palace captured and his country enslaved, perished by his own
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
oneously headed, De Agrorum Qualitate--a title which properly belongs to the following fragment. The writer states that, after having been diverted from his studies, by entering on a military life, his attention was again turned to the measurement of distances (as the height of mountains and the breadth of rivers), from the connection of the subject with his profession. Mention is made in this fragment of the Dacian victory, by which is probably meant the conquest of Dacia under Trajan, in A. D. 104. This fragment is wrongly attributed to Frontinus. Although some of the circumstances of the author's history seem to fit Hyginus (compare Hygin. De Limit. Constit. p. 209, ed. Goes.), it is more likely that the author was Balbus, who wrote a treatise, De Asse, which is inserted in the collections of Antejustinian Law. In the principal manuscript (codex Arcerianus) of the Agrimensores, the fragment is entitled Balbi Liber ad Celsum. 2. De Agrorum Qualitate In p. 38-39, Goes. is an inter
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Marcellus, P. Nera'tius is mentioned by the younger Pliny (Plin. Ep. 3.8) as a person of rank and interest at Trajan's court. He was consul in A. D. 104. (Fasti.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
we can thence calculate the time when he left Spain. The eleventh book seems to have been published at Rome, early in A. D. 100, and at the close of the year he returned to Bilbilis. After keeping silence for three years (xii. prooem.), the twelfth book was despatched from Bilbilis to Rome (12.3,18), and in this lie refers (12.5) to the two preceding hooks, published, as we have seen, in A. D. 99 and 100. Allowing, therefore, for the interval of repose, the twelfth book must be assigned to A. D. 104. It must be observed, however, that if the Parthenius, to whom book xi. is dedicated, and who is again addressed in book xii. (ep. 11), be the "Palatinus Parthenius," the chamberlain of Domitian (4.45, 5.6, 8.28; comp. Sueton. Domit. 16), and if the statement of Victor (Epit. 12), that this Parthenius was cruelly murdered by the soldiery (A. D. 97) soon after the elevation of Nerva, can be depended upon, it is evident that some pieces belonging to earlier years were included in the later b
statement, it must, as is remarked by Kuster (ad locum), have been through oversight. He was born about the time of Nero, and lived to a good old age, having written of the reign of Hadrian. This is all that we know of his life, except on his own authority, as given by Suidas, that he was in his 78th year in the consulship of Herennius Severus, from whose patronage he doubtless received his surname. This consulship, Suidas states, occurred in the 220th Olympiad, the last year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must h
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philon Byblius (search)
statement, it must, as is remarked by Kuster (ad locum), have been through oversight. He was born about the time of Nero, and lived to a good old age, having written of the reign of Hadrian. This is all that we know of his life, except on his own authority, as given by Suidas, that he was in his 78th year in the consulship of Herennius Severus, from whose patronage he doubtless received his surname. This consulship, Suidas states, occurred in the 220th Olympiad, the last year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must h
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