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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 1054 AD or search for 1054 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Constanti'nus X. Monoma'chus ´╝ło( *Monoma/xos), emperor of the East, A. D. 1042-1054. His surname was given him on account of his personal courage in war. In 1042 the government of the empire was in the hands of two imperial sisters, Zoe, the widow of the emperor Romanus Argyrus, and afterwards of Michael IV. the Paphlagonian, and Theodora, a spinster, who were placed on the throne by the inhabitants of Constantinople, after they had deposed the emperor Michael V. Calaphates, the adopted son of Zoe. The two sisters being afraid of their position, Zoe proposed to Constantine Monomachus that he should marry her; and as she was rather advanced in age, being then upwards of sixty, she allowed the gallant warrior to bring his beautiful mistress, Sclerena, with him to the imperial palace, where the two ladies lived together on the best terms. Constantine was saluted as emperor, and conferred the dignity of Augusta upon Sclerena. Soon after the accession of Constantine, Georgius Maniaces, a b
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Joannes or Joannes Mauropus (search)
Joannes or Joannes Mauropus 58. Of EUCHAITA or EUCHAITAE or EUCHANIA, a city of Heleno-Pontus, which had received not long before (i. e. in the time of the emperor Joannes Zimisces) the name of Theodoropolis; it was not far from Amasia. Joannes was archbishop of Euchaita (*Mhtropoli/ths *Eu)xai/+twn), and lived in the time of the emperor Constantine X. Monomachus (A. D. 1042-1054), but nothing further is known of him. he was surnamed MAUROPUS, *Mauro/pous, i. e. " Blackfoot." Works He wrote a number of iambic poems, sermons, and letters. Iambic Poems A volume of his poems was published by Matthew Bust, 4to., Eton, 1610 : the poems occupy only about 73 pp. small 4to., and were probably written on occasion of the church festivals, as they are commemorative of the incidents of the life of Christ, or of the Saints. An Officium, or ritual service, composed by him, and containing three Canones or hymns, is given by Nicolaus Rayaeus in his dissertation De Acolouthia Officii Canonic
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Michael Psellus or Michael Psellus the Younger or the Younger Michael Psellus (search)
ematics, philosophy, and history. He taught philosophy, rhetoric, and dialectics, at Constantinople, where he stood forth as almost the last upholder of the falling cause of learning. The emperors honoured him with the title of Prince of the Philosophers (*Filoso/fwn u(/patos), and did not disdain to use his counsels, and in effecting their elevation he even had a share. The period during which he thus flourished at Constantinople extends over the reigns of Constantinus Monomachus (A. D. 1042-1054), his empress Theodora (to A. D. 1056), and Michael Stratonicus, who succeeded Theodora, and who entrusted Psellus with a conciliatory mission to Isaac Comnenus, whom the soldiers had saluted emperor in A. D. 1057. He still remained in favour with both these emperors, and with Constantinus Ducas, who succeeded Comnenus in A.D. 1060, and also with his successor Eudocia, and her three sons. When Romanus Diogenes, whom Eudocia had married, was also declared emperor (A. D. 1068), Psellus was one