hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 8 results in 8 document sections:

Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 401 (search)
lt the temple, and encompassed a piece of land about it with a wall, which land was twice as large as that before enclosed. The expenses he laid out upon it were vastly large also, and the riches about it were unspeakable. A sign of which you have in the great cloisters that were erected about the temple, and the citadel which was on its north side. The cloisters he built from the foundation, but the citadel This fort was first built, as it is supposed, by John Hyrcanus; see Prid. at the year 107; and called "Baris," the Tower or Citadel. It was afterwards rebuilt, with great improvements, by Herod, under the government of Antonius, and was named from him "the Tower of Antoni;" and about the time when Herod rebuilt the temple, he seems to have put his last hand to it. See Antiq. B. XVIII. ch. 5. sect. 4; Of the War, B. I. ch. 3. sect. 3; ch. 5. sect. 4. It lay on the northwest side of the temple, and was a quarter as large. he repaired at a vast expense; nor was it other than a royal
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK II. AN ACCOUNT OF THE WORLD AND THE ELEMENTS., CHAP. 89. (87.)—WHAT ISLANDS HAVE BEEN FORMED, AND AT WHAT PERIODS. (search)
ds formed; Anapha, which is beyond Melos; Nea, between Lemnos and the Hellespont; Halone, between Lebedos and Teos; TheraBrotier remarks, that, according to the account of Herodotus, this island existed previous to the date here assigned to it; Lemaire, i. 412, 413: it is probable, however, that the same name was applied to two islands, one at least of which was of volcanic origin. and Therasia, among the Cyclades, in the fourth year of the 135th OlympiadU.C. 517, A.C. 237; and U.C. 617, A.C. 107; respectively.. And among the same islands, 130 years afterwards, Hiera, also called AutomateHiera, Automata; ab i(era\, sacer, et au)toma/th, sponte nascens. Respecting the origin of these islands there would appear to be some confusion in the dates, which it is difficult to reconcile with each other; it is, I conceive, impossible to decide whether this depends upon an error of our author himself, or of his transcribers., made its appearance; also Thia, at the distance of two stadia from the
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
Amphitheatrum Castrense, 5; additions to Amphitheatrum Flavium (Colosseum), 6; Odeum restored, 371; Thermae Suranae, 532; Thermae of Trajan, 534; Arch, 47; Pantheon burnt, 383; extends Aqua Marcia to Aventine, 23, 26 extends Anio Novus, 12. 101Books replaced in Library of Temple of Augustus (?), 84. Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 104Remains of the Domus Aurea damaged by fire, 170, 172.M Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 107(?) Pomerium extended, 393. 109(ca.). Aqua Trajana, 28. 112Basilica Ulpia completed, 241. 113Forum of Trajan dedicated, 237. 117-138Reign of Hadrian: he builds Temple of Trajan, 244; Temple of Matidia, 331; restores Temple of Bona Dea Subsaxana, 85; restores shrine of Vesta, 59, and extends House of Vestals, 59; restores Temple of Divus Julius, 287; Mausoleum, 336; repairs Aqua Marcia, 25; cross-walls in Temple of Augustus, 64; re
Emperor Theodosius II. to the church of St. Ignatius (previously known as the Tychaeum, or Temple of Fortune), in the city of Antioch. (Evagr. H. E. 1.16.) Their subsequent removals are uncertain. The martyrdom of St. Ignatius is commemorated by the Romish church on the 1st of Feb.; by the Greek church on the 20th December, the correct anniversary of his martyrdom. The year of Ignatius's death has been much disputed. Many of the best writers (following the Martyrium Ignatii), place it in A. D. 107; but others contend for a later date; some as late as A. D. 116. Works Letters On his way from Antioch to Rome, Ignatius is said to have written seven epistles. These are enumerated both by Eusebius (Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 3.46) and Jerome (De Viris Illustr 100.16). The fact of his having written letters, though without specifying either the number or the parties to whom they are addressed, is attested by his contemporary, Polycarp (ad Philipp. 100.13. Vers. Lat.), who collected several a
, or by a heathen acquainted with the Jewish Scriptures. This is, in all probability, the author, and the work referred to by Josephus and Clemens Alexandrinus. Of course the author must have lived before the time of Alexander Polyhistor, who came to Rome, B. C. 83. It is doubtful whether he is the same writer with the geographer of the same name, mentioned above. Philon 13. Of TARSUS, a deacon. He was a companion of Ignatius of Antioch, and accompanied the martyr from the East to Rome, A. D. 107. He is twice mentioned in the epistles of Ignatius (ad Philadelph. 100.11, ad Smyrnaeos, 100.13). He is supposed to have written, along with Rheus Agathopus, the Martyrium Ignatii, for which see IGNATIUS, in this work, Vol. II. p. 566b. (Comp. Cave, Hist Litt. p. 28. ed. Genevae 1720 Philon 14. Of THEBES. is quoted by Plutarch as an au thority in his Life of Alexander (c.46). He is probably the same Philon, who is mentioned as an authority for the Indian Antissa by Stephanus Byzantinus
Philon 13. Of TARSUS, a deacon. He was a companion of Ignatius of Antioch, and accompanied the martyr from the East to Rome, A. D. 107. He is twice mentioned in the epistles of Ignatius (ad Philadelph. 100.11, ad Smyrnaeos, 100.13). He is supposed to have written, along with Rheus Agathopus, the Martyrium Ignatii, for which see IGNATIUS, in this work, Vol. II. p. 566b. (Comp. Cave, Hist Litt. p. 28. ed. Genevae 1720
death, Polycarp obtained. We are the more disposed to admit the early origin and the truth of the leading statements embodied in the narration, as the natural tendency of a forger of a later age would have been to exaggerate the opportunities of Apostolic intercourse, and the sanctions of Apostolic authority, which Polycarp certainly possessed. Polycarp was bishop of Smyrna at the time when Ignatius of Antioch passed through that city on his way to suffer death at Rome, some time between A. D. 107 and 116. [IGNATIUS, No. 1.] Ignatius seems to have enjoyed much this intercourse with Polycarp, whom he had known, apparently, in former days, when they were both hearers of the apostle John. (Martyr. Ignatii, 100.3.) The sentiment of esteem was reciprocated by Polycarp, who collected several of the epistles of Ignatius, and sent them to the church at Philippi, accompanied by an epistle of his own. (Polyc. Epistol. ad Ptilipp. 100.13.) Polycarp himself visited Rome while Anicetus was bisho
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
aulina. This marriage took place before the accession of Trajan to the empire; and Servianus was so jealous of the favour of his brother-in-law with Trajan, that he attempted to stop him when he was hastening to Trajan in Germany to announce the death of Nerva in A. D. 96. Servianus afterwards became reconciled to Hadrian, and appears to have lived on good terms with him during the reign of Trajan. By this emperor lie was twice raised to the consulship, as we see from inscriptions, once in A. D. 107, and again in 111. It was also during the reign of Trajan that he married his daughter to Fuscus Salinator, on which occasion Pliny wrote him a letter of congratulation. (Plin. Ep. 6.26.) Hadrian, on his accession in A. D. 117, appeared to have quite forgotten and forgiven the former enmity of Servianus, for lie treated him with distinguished honour, raised him to the consulship for the third time in A. D. 134, and gave him hopes of succeeding to the empire. But when he resolved to appoint