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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 1078 AD or search for 1078 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Nice'phorus Iii. Botania'tes ´╝ło( *Botania/ths,) emperor of Constantinople A. D. 1078-1081. He belonged to an illustrious family which boasted of a descent from the Fabii of Rome. He was looked upon as a brave general, but his military skill was the only quality that recommended him. It is related in the life of the emperor Michael VII. Parapinaces, how Michael lost his throne in consequence of the contemporaneous rebellion of Bryennius and Botaniates, the subject of this article, and that the latter succeeded Michael on the throne. Botaniates was crowned on the 25th of AMarch, 1078, and soon afterwards married Maria, the wife of Michael, from whom she became divorced by the deposed emperor taking holy orders. Before Nicephorus could enjoy his crown he had to defend it against Bryennius, whom he routed and made a prisoner in the bloody battle of Salabrya. Bryennius met the fate of most of the unfortunate rebels: he had his eves put out, and was finally assassinated. Nicephorus made him
Palaeo'logus 1. NICEPHORUS PALAEOLOGUS, with the title of Hypertimus, was a faithful servant of the emperor Nicephorus III. Botaniates (A. D. 1078-1031), and was rewarded by him with the government of Mesopotamia. He perished in battle in the reign of his successor Alexius I. Comnenus, while defending Dyrrhachium (Durazzo) against the Normans, A. D. 1081.
ogue between the soul and the body. It is addressed to another monk, Callinicus ; and begins with these two lines :-- pw=s ka/qh|; pw=s a)merimnei=s; pw=s a)melwi=s, yuxh/ mou ; o( xro/nos sou peplh/rwtai : e)/celqe tou= sarki/ou. The work, in its complete state, consisted of five books; but most of the MSS. are mutilated or otherwise defective, and want the first book. Some of them have been interpolated by a later hand. Michael Psellus, not the older writer of that name, who died about A. D. 1078, but one of later date, wrote a preface and notes to the Dioptra of Philip. Editions A Latin prose translation of the Dioptra by the Jesuit Jacobus Pontanus, with notes, by another Jesuit, Jacobus Gretserus, was published, 4to. Ingoldstadt, 1604; but it was made from a mutilated copy, and consisted of only four books, and these, as the translator admits in his Praefatio ad Lectorem, interpolated and transposed ad libitum. Philip wrote also :-- 2. *Tw=| kata\ pneu=ma ui(w=| kai\ i(erei
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philippus SOLITARIUS. (search)
ogue between the soul and the body. It is addressed to another monk, Callinicus ; and begins with these two lines :-- pw=s ka/qh|; pw=s a)merimnei=s; pw=s a)melwi=s, yuxh/ mou ; o( xro/nos sou peplh/rwtai : e)/celqe tou= sarki/ou. The work, in its complete state, consisted of five books; but most of the MSS. are mutilated or otherwise defective, and want the first book. Some of them have been interpolated by a later hand. Michael Psellus, not the older writer of that name, who died about A. D. 1078, but one of later date, wrote a preface and notes to the Dioptra of Philip. Editions A Latin prose translation of the Dioptra by the Jesuit Jacobus Pontanus, with notes, by another Jesuit, Jacobus Gretserus, was published, 4to. Ingoldstadt, 1604; but it was made from a mutilated copy, and consisted of only four books, and these, as the translator admits in his Praefatio ad Lectorem, interpolated and transposed ad libitum. Philip wrote also :-- 2. *Tw=| kata\ pneu=ma ui(w=| kai\ i(erei
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Michael Psellus or Michael Psellus the Younger or the Younger Michael Psellus (search)
y whom he had been so thoroughly imbued with the love of letters, that, in spite of the remonstrances of Psellus, he devoted himself to study and writing poetry, to the neglect of his imperial duties. To this folly Michael added the ingratitude of permitting his tutor to be supplanted in his favour by Joannes Italus, a man of far less talent, but an eloquent sophist, and a great favourite with the nobles, in discussions with whom the emperor spent his time. The deposition of Michael Ducas (A. D. 1078) was followed by the fall of Psellus, who was compelled by the new emperor, Nicephorns Botanias, to retire into a monastery; and in his dishonoured old age he witnessed the elevation of his rival to the title of Prince of the Philosophers, which he imself had so long held, and which the next emperor, Alexius Comnenus, conferred upon Joannes, in A. D. 1081. Psellus appears to have lived at least till A. D. 1105; some suppose that he was still alive in 1110, the thirtieth year of Alexius Com
ral parts of this account are, however, very questionable, as we shall take occasion to show. It has been already observed [CEDRENUS, GEORGIUS] that the portion of the history of Cedrenus which extends from the death of the emperor Nicephorus I. (A. D. 811) to the close of the work (A. D. 1057), is found almost verbatim in the history of Joannes Scylitzes, which commences from the death of Nicephorus 1. (A. D. 811), and extends, in the printed copies, to the reign of Nicephorus Botaniotes (A. D. 1078-1081). From this circumstance two questions arise. Did Cedrenus borrow from Scylitzes, or Scylitzes from Cedrenus P and, did Scylitzes publish two editions of his history, or only one? The former question is the more important. As the history of Scylitzes, in its present form, extends to a period more than twenty years after that at which Cedrenus closes his work, the natural inference, if we judged from this circumstance alone, would be that Scylitzes was the later writer. And this was