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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ans. (D. C. 55.31). After a distinguished commencement of his military career, he returned to Rome in A. D. 10, to announce in person the victorious termination of the war, whereupon he was honoured with triumphal insignia (without an actual triumph), and the rank (not the actual office) of praetor, with permission to be a candidate for the consulship before the regular time. (D. C. 6.17.) The successes in Pannonia and Dalmatia were followed by the destruction of Varus and his legions. In A. D. 11, Tiberius was despatched to defend the empire against the Germans, and was accompanied by Germanicus as proconsul. The two generals crossed the Rhine, made various incursions into the neighbouring territory, and, at the beginning of autumn, re-crossed the river. (D. C. 56.25.) Germanicus returned to Rome in the winter, and in the following year discharged the office of consul, though he had never been aedile nor praetor. In the highest magistracy, he did not scruple to appear as an advocate
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Le'pida, Aemi'lia 2. The sister of M'. Aemilius Lepidus, who was consul A. D. 11. [LEPIDUS, No. 25.] She was descended from L. Sulla and Cn. Pompey, and was at one time destined for the wife of L. Caesar, the grandson of Augustus. She was, however, subsequently married to P. Quirinus, who divorced her, and who, twenty years after the divorce, in A. D. 20, accused her of having falsely pretended to have had a son by him: at the same time she was charged with adultery, poisoning, and having consulted the Chaldaeans for the purpose of injuring the imperial family. Though she was a woman of abandoned character, her prosecution by her former husband excited much compassion among the people; but as Tiberius, notwithstanding his dissimulation, was evidently in favour of the prosecution, Lepida was condemned by the senate, and interdicted from fire and water. (Tac. Ann. 3.22, 23; Suet. Tib. 49.)
Le'pidus 25. M'. Aemilius Lepidus, Q. F., the son apparently of No. 21, was consul with T. Statilius Taurus in A. D. 11. (D. C. 56.25.) He must be carefully distinguished from his contemporary M. Aemilius Lepidus, with whom he is frequently confounded. [See No. 23.] Though we cannot trace the descent of this M'. Lepidus [see No. 21], yet among his ancestors on the female side were L. Sulla and Cn. Pompey. (Tac. Ann. 3.22.) It is perhaps this M'. Lepidus who defended Piso in A. D. 20; and it was undoubtedly this Lepidus who defended his sister later in the same year. [LEPIDA, No. 2.] In A. D. 21 he obtained the province of Asia, but Sex. Pompey declared in the senate that Lepidus ought to be deprived of it, because he was indolent, poor, and a disgrace to his ancestors, but the senate would not listen to Pompey, maintaining that Lepidus was of an easy rather than a slothful character, and that the manner in which he had lived on his small patrimony was to his honour rather than his dis
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Messall'na Stati'lia granddaughter of T. Statilius Taurus, cos. A. D. 11, was the third wife of the emperor Nero, who married her in A. D. 66. She had previously espoused Atticus Vestinus, cos. in that year, whom Nero put to death without accusation or trial, merely that he might marry Messallina. After Nero's death Otho, had he been successful against Vitellius, purposed to have married her, and in the letters he sent to his friends before he destroyed himself, were some addressed to Messallina. (Tac. Ann. 15.68; Suet. Nero 35, Oth. 10.) There are only Greek coins of this empress. [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Taurus, Stati'lius 2. T. Statilius Taurus, probably son of No. 1. was consul, A. D. 11, with M. Aemilius Lepidus. (D. C. 56.25.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
nstructed several great roads in the empire; he built libraries at Rome, one of which, called the Ulpia Bibliotheca, is often mentioned ; and a theatre in the Campus Martius. His great work was the Forum Trajanum, the site of which was an elevation which was removed, and the ground was levelled to a plain, in the centre of which was placed the column of Trajan, the height of which marked the height of the earth which had been removed. The inscription on the column fixes the date at the year A. D. 11 2, the sixth consulship of Trajan. Apollodorus was Trajan's architect. Trajan constructed the port of Ancona, on the ancient mole of which there still stands a triumphal arch, dedicated to Trajan, his wife, and his sister. The inscription on the bridge of Alcantara over the Tagus belonged to the year A. D. 106, but though the inscription was in honour of Trajan, it states that the bridge was made at the common expense of the several towns which are there mentioned. Under the reign of Traj
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Joannes Tzetzes (search)
Joannes Tzetzes 1. JOANNES (*)Iwa/nnhs *Tze/tzhs), a Greek grammarian of Constantinople. The period when he flourished may be gathered from his own statement, that he wrote one hundred years after Michael Psellus (Chil. 11.719), and from the fact that he dedicated his Homeric Allegories to Irene Augusta, the wife of Manuel Comnenus. who died A. D. 11 58. The father of Joannes Tzetzes was Michael Tzetzes. His another's name was Endocia (Chil. 5.611). He was himself named after his paternal grandfather, a native of Byzantium. a man of some wealth, who, though not a learned man, showed great respect for scholars (ib. 615). His maternal grandmother was of a Basque or Iberian family. The earlier part of his life he spent with his brother Isaac at home, where they received various wholesome precepts from their father, urging them to prefer learning to riches, power, or precedence. (Chil. 3.157, 4.566, &c.) At the age of fifteen he was placed under the instruction of tutors, who not only
g in an uninhabited country, making from twenty-five to thirty miles a day, is no longer by me classed with trips of pleasure. With your modern improvements you accomplish as much in two days as we can in a month. Although we do not travel far in a day, it is sufficiently fatiguing. We are, every morning, on our feet at the first peep of dawn; and, as the glorious orb of day discloses his radiant face, which in this sunny climate is almost every day, we begin our march. We continue till 11 A. Mr., and start again about 2 P. M., and stop for the night, about five o'clock, in some romantic spot made hospitable to us by Dame Nature; and so, on and on, as one day, so all. A first trip is delightful; all that is beautiful and charming, and much that is magnificent or sublime, in scenery, daily feasts the eye. But even this becomes tiresome and uninteresting when seen too often. I took Sid His son, thirteen years old. with me on my last trip. It was a rich treat to him. He swam
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Steuart's brigade at the battle of Gettysburg.--a narrative by Rev. Randolph H. McKim, D. D., late First Lieutenant and Aide-de-camp, Confederate army. (search)
vement. But it was done, not before a charge of the enemy, but in obedience to orders, and we were not pursued, nor were the works occupied by the Federals until we reached Rock creek, at the base of the hill. A few of our men on our left, rather than incur the danger of retiring down the hill under that very heavy fire, remained behind in the entrenchments and gave themselves up. The base of the hill reached, skirmishers were thrown out, and we remained on the west side of Rock creek till 11} P. M., when we retired silently and unmolested. I find the following record in my diary referring to the time when we retired to the foot of the hill: New troops were brought on, and fighting continued until now (5 P. M). This must refer to picket firing. It only remains that I give such statement of our losses as my materials enable me to make. Unfortunately, I have returns only from three regiments recorded. In the Tenth Virginia (which I think was very small) the loss was (killed,
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
r promised in a couple of hours, and we all sat down on the grass to wait — or rather on the leaves, for this sandy soil produces no grass to speak of. As I had time to look about and, still more to sniff about, I became aware that the spot was not so charming as it looked. There had been a heavy cavalry skirmish in the woods and they were full of dead horses, which, as the evening closed, became, as Agassiz would say, highly offensive. It was positively frightful! and there I waited till eleven at night! Not even the novelty of the position was enough to distract one's attention. As to the pickets, they were determined to have also a truce, for, when a Reb officer went down the line to give some order, he returned quite aghast, and said the two lines were together, amiably conversing. He ordered both to their posts, but I doubt if they staid. At half-past 8 we had quite a disagreeable experience. There suddenly was heard a shot or two towards our left centre, then quite a voll
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