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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for 1100 AD or search for 1100 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's capture of New Orleans. (search)
otes a dispatch from Porter himself which shows his recognition of the fact that the Confederates were strengthening their defenses during this period. Porter says, speaking of the siege, that the enemy was daily adding to his defense and strengthening his naval forces with iron-clad batteries. What was the situation of affairs in Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip about this time — the 22d of April--as shown by the testimony before the Confederate Court of Inquiry? In the two garrisons of 1100 men, 4 soldiers had been killed and 14 wounded--7 guns of the armament of 126 had been disabled. The barracks and citadel of Fort Jackson had been destroyed by fire. There was nothing more to burn. Whenever the gun-boats approached the defenses a vigorous fire was opened on them by both forts, but when they retired the soldiers withdrew to the casemates out of reach of the mortar-fire. And up to this time the mortar-flotilla had fired more than 13,500 shells. Porter had expected to r
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
. On parade: 1 6-pounder; 12-pounder; 1 24-pounder field howitzer. Total, 52 guns. Chalmette and McGehee lines. Brig.-Gen. Martin L. Smith. Subordinate Commanders: Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Buisson, Lieut.-Col. William E. Pinkney, Capt. Patton, Lieut-Butler, et al. General Lovell reports that the city of New Orleans was only garrisoned by about 3000 ninety-day troops. The strength of the garrisons of the two forts is stated by Col. Higgins, in his testimony before the Court of Inquiry, as 1100 men. The loss at Forts Jackson and St. Philip was 11 killed and 39 wounded; and at the upper batteries 1 killed and 1 wounded. At Fort Jackson 121 officers and men were surrendered; number at other points not fully reported. Relative strength of the opposing forces. in a letter to the Editors, Professor J. R. Soley, U. S. N. says: In discussing the question of the relative force of the two sides (see p. 33), it should be borne in mind that of the Confederate total of 166 guns, 11
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
Tennessee to harass Grant, and bring back such information as he could get. Dwellings in Iuka. From photographs taken in 1884. 1. General George 11. Thomas's headquarters. 2. Female seminary, used as a hospital. 3. General Price's headquarters. 4. Iuka Springs. 5. Methodist Church, used as a hospital. 6. General Rosecrans's headquarters. 7. General Grant's headquarters. Taking 1600 men, Armstrong reached Holly Springs on the 26th of August, and having been reinforced there by 1100 men under Jackson, struck for Bolivar, Tennessee. There he encountered and defeated a force under Colonel Leggett, who, in his report of this affair, says that after fighting for seven hours with less than 900 he drove from the field over 6000. Armstrong then crossed the Hatchie and cut the railroad between Bolivar and Jackson. He then turned back to Tupelo. On the way he met a force under Colonel Dennis, whose brigade commander, General L. F. Ross, reported that with 800 men he met Armst