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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 1 1 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, VENUS ET ROMA, TEMPLUM (search)
. It was also called templum urbis Romae (Serv. Aen. ii. 227), templum urbis (Amm. Marcell. xvi. 10. 14; Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19; Cassiod. Chron.), urbis Venerisque templa (Prud. c. Sym. i. 221), and possibly templum Veneris)*afrodi/sion (Cass. Dio lxxi. 31). (Hist. Aug. trig. tyr. 32). The plans were drawn by Hadrian himself, and evoked sharp criticism from his Greek architect, Apollodorus, who is said to have been put to death in consequence (Cass. Dio lxix. 4). The temple was dedicated in 135 A.D. (Hieron. loc. cit.; cf. Athen. viii. 63, p. 361, who erroneously gives the day as the Parilia), but perhaps finished by Antoninus Pius (Cohen, Hadrian 1420-1423, Pius 698-703, 1074-1076). In accordance with Roman theory in such matters, it was necessary to build a separate cella for each goddess, in this case not side by side, but back to back, that of Venus facing east, and that of Roma west (Prud. loc. cit.: atque Urbis Venerisque pari se culmine tollunt templa). In 307 the temple was inj