hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 4 4 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 1185 AD or search for 1185 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

o.). 3. A Commentary on Pindar A commentary on Pindar, which however seems to be lost, at least no MS. of it has yet come to light. The introduction to it, however, is still extant. Editions The surviving introduction was first edited by Tafel in his Eustathii Thessalonicensis Opuscula, Frankfurt, 1832, 4to., from which it was reprinted separately by Schneidewin, Eustalhiiprooenium commentariorum Pindaricorum, Göttingen, 1837, 8vo. The other works of Eustathius which were published for the first time by Tafel in the Opuscula just mentioned, are chiefly of a theological nature; there is, however, among them one (p. 267, &c.) which is of great historical interest, viz. the account of the taking of Thessalonica by the Normans in A. D. 1185. Other figures by the name of Eustathius The name Eustathius is one of very common occurrency during the Byzantine period, and a list of all the known Eustathii is given by Fabricius. Further Information Bibl. Graec. vol. ix. p 149, &c.[L.S
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Joannes PHOCAS (search)
o reigned A. D. 1143-1180) in Asia Minor. Works *)/Ekfrasis e)nduno/yei tw=n a)p' *)Antioxei/as me/xris *(Ierosolu/mwn ka/dtrwn kai\ xwrw=n *Suri/as kai\ *Foini/khs kai\ tw=n kata\ *Palaisti/nhn a(gi/wn to/pwn, Compendiaria Descriptio Castrorum et Urbiumsic in Allat. vers. ab Urbe Antiochia usque Hierosolymam; necnon Syriae ac Phoeniciae, et in Palestina Sacrorum Locorum. He married, and had a son, by whom his work was transcribed; and afterwards became a monk and priest, and visited (A. D. 1185) Syria and Palestine, of which he wrote a short geographical account, entitled *)/Ekfrasis e)nduno/yei tw=n a)p' *)Antioxei/as me/xris *(Ierosolu/mwn ka/dtrwn kai\ xwrw=n *Suri/as kai\ *Foini/khs kai\ tw=n kata\ *Palaisti/nhn a(gi/wn to/pwn, Compendiaria Descriptio Castrorum et Urbiumsic in Allat. vers. ab Urbe Antiochia usque Hierosolymam; necnon Syriae ac Phoeniciae, et in Palestina Sacrorum Locorum. Editions The work was published by Allatius, with a Latin version, in his *Su/mmikta,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Isaa'cus Ii., A'ngelus> (*)Isaa/kios o( *)/Aggelos), emperor of Constantinople (A. D. 1185 --1195), was the eldest son of Andronicus Angelus, and was born in the middle half of the 12th century. Belonging to one of the great Byzantine families and descended, through his grandmother Theodora, from the imperial family of the Comneni, he held several offices of importance in the reign of the emperor Manuel Comnenus; but his name remained obscure, and the emperor Andronicus Comnenus, the exterminatin favour of any one persecuted by that cruel emperor, the fickle people of Constantinople suddenly took up arms, killed the officers despatched by Hagiochristophorites to put Isaac to death, and proclaimed the latter emperor of Constantinople (A. D. 1185). Andronicus hastened to his capital, but it was too late he was seized by the mob, and, by order, or at least with the consent of Isaac, perished in the miserable manner which is related in his life. [ANDRONICUS I.] No sooner was Isaac firml