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of Roman emperors, reigned from A. D. 37 to A. D. 41. His real name was Caius Caesar, and he received that of Caligula in the camp, from caligae, the foot dress of the common soldiers, when he was yet a boy with his father in Germany. As emperor, however, he was always called by his contemporaries Caius, and he regarded the name of Caligula as an insult. (Senec. De Constant. 18.) He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius, by Agrippina, and was born on the 31st ot August, A. D. 12. (Suet. Cal. 8.) The place of his birth was a matter of doubt with the ancients ; according to some, it was Tibur; according to others, Treves on the Moselle; but Suetonius has proved from the public documents of Antium that he was born at that town. His earliest years were spent in the camp of his father in Germany, and he grew up among the soldiers, with whom he became accordingly very popular. (Tac. Annal. 1.41, 69; Suet. Cal. 9; D. C. 57.5.) Caligula also accompanied his father on his
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ime-serving adherent to the new order of things. The complaisance of Capito found favour with Augustus, who accelerated his promotion to the consulship, in order, says Tacitus (Tac. Ann. 3.75),that he might obtain precedence over Labeo. It may be that Capito was made consul before the proper age, that is, before his 43rd year. He was consul suffectus with C. Vibius Postumus in A. D. 5. Several writers erroneously confound the jurist with C. Fonteius Capito, who was consul with Germanicus in A. D. 12. Pomponius says (as we interpret his words), that Labeo refused the offer of Augustus to make him the colleague of Capito. Ex his Ateius consul fuit : Labeo noluit, quum offerretur ei ab Augusto consulatus, et honorem suscipere. (Dig. 1. tit. 2. s. 2.47.) We cannot agree with the commentators who attempt to reconcile the statement of Pomponius with the inference that would naturally be drawn from the antithesis of Tacitus : Illi [Labeoni]. quod praeturam intra stetit, commendatio ex injur
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Ca'pito, Fonteius 4. C. Fonteius Capito, a son of C. Fonteius Capito, the friend of M. Antony. [No. 3.] He was consul in A. D. 12, together with Germanicus, and afterwards had, as proconsul, the administration of the province of Asia. Many years later, in A. D. 25, he was accused by Vibius Serenus, apparently on account of his conduct in Asia; but, as no sufficient evidence was adduced, he was acquitted. (Fasti Cap.; Suet. Cal. 8; Tac. Ann. 4.36.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ough we must carefully separate what is certain from what is doubtful. Thus it is often asserted that the thirteenth satire belongs to A. D. 119 or even to A. D. 127, because written sixty years after the consulship of Fonteius (see 5.17), as if it were unquestionable that this Fonteius must be the C. Fonteius Capito who was consul A. D. 59, or the L. Fonteius Capito who was consul A. D. 67, while, in reality, the individual indicated is in all probability C. Fonteius Capito, who was consul A. D. 12, since we know, from Statius, that Rutilius Gallicus (see 5.157) was actually city praefect under Domitian. Again, the contest between the inhabitants of Ombi and of Tentyra is said (15.27) to have happened " nuper consule Junio; " but even admitting this name to be correct, and the MSS. here vary much, we cannot tell whether we ought to fix upon Appius Junius Sabinus, consul A. D. 84, or upon Q. Junius Rusticus, consul A. D. 119. We have, however, fortunately evidence more precise. 1. We
k had related merely to past times,he probably would not have feared to have read it. Labienus seems never to have been engaged in any plots against Augustus; but his enemies at length revenged themselves upon him, by obtaining a decree of the senate that all his writings should be burnt. This indignity affected Labienus so much, that, resolving not to survive the productions of his genius, he shut himself up in the tombs of his ancestors, and thus perished. His death probably took place in A. D. 12, as Dio Cassius relates (56.27) that several libellous works were burnt in that year. Caligula allowed the writings of Labienus, as well as those of Cremutius Cordus and Cassius Severus, which had shared the same fate, to be again collected and read. (Senec. Controv. v. pp. 328-330, ed. Bipont.; Suet. Cal. 16.) We find mention of only three orations of Labienus:-1. An oration for Figulus against the heirs of Urbinia: the cause of the latter was pleaded by C. Asinius Pollio. (Quint. Inst.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ich shewynge theyr Operacyons and Vertues set in the margent of this Boke, to the entent you myght know theyr vertues." There is no date; but it was printed by "Robt. Wyer, dwellynge at the sygne of Saynt Johan evangelyste, in Seynt Martyns Parysshe, in the byshop of Norwytche rentes, besyde Charynge Crosse." Macer, Aemi'lius Works Bellum Trojanum 2. We must carefully distinguish from Aemilius Macer of Verona, Macer who was one of the Latin Homeristae, and who must have been alive in A. D. 12, since he is addressed by Ovid in the 2d book of the Epistles from Pontus (Ep. x.), and is there spoken of as an old travelling companion, his literary undertaking being clearly described in the lines: -- Tu canis aeterno quidquid restabat Homero, Ne careant summa Troica bella manu; while elsewhere (ex Pont. 4.16. 6) he is designated as" Iliacus Macer." We gather from Appuleius that the title of his work was Bellum Trojanum. Further Information Hieron. in Chron, Euseb. Ol. cxci. ; Ov. Tr
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Macer, Aemi'lius Works Bellum Trojanum 2. We must carefully distinguish from Aemilius Macer of Verona, Macer who was one of the Latin Homeristae, and who must have been alive in A. D. 12, since he is addressed by Ovid in the 2d book of the Epistles from Pontus (Ep. x.), and is there spoken of as an old travelling companion, his literary undertaking being clearly described in the lines: -- Tu canis aeterno quidquid restabat Homero, Ne careant summa Troica bella manu; while elsewhere (ex Pont. 4.16. 6) he is designated as" Iliacus Macer." We gather from Appuleius that the title of his work was Bellum Trojanum. Further Information Hieron. in Chron, Euseb. Ol. cxci. ; Ov. Tr. 4.10. 43; Quintilian. 6.3.96, 10.1. §§ 56, 87, 12.11.27; Appuleius, de Orthograph. § 18; Maffei, Verona Illustruta, 2.19; Broukhus. ad Tibull. 2.6; Wernsdorf, Poet. Lat. Min. vol. iv. p. 5
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
e latter in Germany, Pannonia, and Dalmatia, and, by his activity and ability, gained the favour of the future emperor. He was accordingly promoted to the quaestorship, and in A. D. 6, when he was quaestor elect, he conducted to Tiberius the forces which had been lately levied in the city. In his quaestorship in the following year, A. D. 7, he was excused from drawing lots for a province, and continued to serve as legatus under Tiberius. He accompanied his commander on his return to Rome in A. D. 12, and mentions with pride that he and his brother Magius Celer took a prominent part in the triumphal procession of Tiberius, and were decorated with military honours. Two years afterwards, A. D. 14, the names of Velfices leius and his brother were put down by Augustus for the praetorship; but as that emperor died before the comitia were held, they were elected to this dignity at the commencement of the reign of Tiberius. We have no further particulars of the life of Paterculus, for there i
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Seve'rus, Verula'nus a legatus of Corbulo, under whom he served in the East, in A. D. 60-12 (Tac. Ann. 14.26, 15.3). The L. Verulanus Severus, who was consul suffectus under Trajan in A. D. 108, was perhaps a son of the preceding.
the brother of C. and L. Caesares, but there was nothing to hope for from him; and Germanicus was too young to be adopted by Augustus with a view to the direct succession. From the year of his adoption to the death of Augustus, A. D. 14, Tiberius was in command of the Roman armies, though he visited Rome several times. He was sent into Germany A. D. 4, and the historian Velleius Paterculus accompanied him as praefectus equitum. Tiberius reduced all Illyricumn to subjection A. D. 9; and in A. D. 12 he had the honour of a triumph at Rome for his German and Dalmatian victories. Tiberius displayed military talent during his transalpine campaigns ; he maintained discipline in his army, and took care of the comforts of his soldiers. In A. D. 14 Augustius held his last census, in which he had Tiberius for his colleague. Tiberius being sent to settle the affairs of Illyricum, Augustus accompanied him as far as Beneventum, but as the emperor was on his way back to Rome he died at Nola. on t