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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 14 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for 1200 AD or search for 1200 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
, and denied having promised to procure a passport for Stone from Gen. Huger. December 14 Nothing. December 15 The President's private secretary, Capt. Josselyn, was in to-day. He had no news. December 16 We hear to-day that the loyal men of Kentucky have met in convention and adopted an ordinance of secession and union with our Confederacy. December 17 Bravo, Col. Edward Johnson! He was attacked by 5000 Yankees on the Alleghany Mountains, and he has beaten them with 1200 men. They say Johnson is an energetic man, and swears like a trooper; and instead of a sword, he goes into battle with a stout cane in his hand, with which he belabors any skulking miscreant found dodging in the hour of danger. December 18 Men escaped from the Eastern Shore of Virginia report that Mr. Custis had landed there, and remains quiet. December 19 Judge Perkins came in to-day and denounced in bitter terms the insane policy of granting passports to spies and others to leav
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
n. Lee is content and has no idea of crossing the river. There are two notable rumors in the streets : first, that we have gained a great battle in Tennessee; and, second, that the government at Washington has arrested John Van Buren and many other Democratic leaders in the North, which has resulted in a riot, wherein 1000 have fallen, making the gutters in New York run with blood! Gen. Lee's official report says our loss in the battle of the 13th in killed and wounded did not exceed 1200, whereas our papers said 2050 wounded have already been brought to this city. Well, our government must have spies at Washington as an offset to Federal spies here among Gen. Winder's policemen; for we knew exactly when the enemy would begin operations in North Carolina, and ordered the cotton east of the Weldon Railroad to be burnt on the 16th inst., yesterday, and yesterday the road was cut by the enemy. I have not heard of the cotton being burnt-and I don't believe it was destroyed. N
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
ilkes, and this may lead to war. The war, however, would not be intended as a diversion in our behalf. Nothing is heard to-day from Lee, except what appears in Northern papers several days old, when our troops were occupying Hagerstown, Cumberland, etc., in Maryland, and foraging pretty extensively in Pennsylvania. Nothing from Vicksburg. Just as I apprehended! The brigade ordered away from Hanover to Gordonsville, upon a wild-goose chase, had not been gone many hours before some 1200 of the enemy's cavalry appeared there, and burnt the bridges which the brigade had been guardingl This is sottishness, rather than generalship, in our local commanders. A regiment was sent up when firing was heard (the annihilation of our weak guard left at the bridges) and arrived just two hours too late. The enemy rode back, with a hundred mules they had captured, getting under cover of their gun-boats. To-day, it is said, Gen. Elzey is relieved, and Gen. Ransom, of North Carolina,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
d, from falling into the hands of the enemy. During the siege, he got 250,000 percussion caps from Gen. Johnston's scouts, and 150,000 from the enemy's pickets, for a consideration. There was abundance of powder. The ammunition and small arms turned over to the enemy, on the surrender, consisted as follows: 36,000 cartridges for Belgian rifles; 3600 Brunswick cartridges; 75,000 rounds British rifled muskets; 9000 shot-gun cartridges; 1300 Maynard cartridges; 5000 Hall's carbine cartridges; 1200 holster pistol cartridges; 35,000 percussion caps; 19,000 pounds of cannon powder. All this was in the ordnance depots, and exclusive of that in the hands of the troops and in the ordnance wagons, doubtless a large amount. He says 8000 defective arms were destroyed by fires during the bombardment. The troops delivered to the enemy, on marching out, 27,000 arms. The Governor demanded the State magazine to-day of the War Department, in whose custody it has been for a long time. What
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXV. February, 1864 (search)
ves of fighting age they must provide for; and these, although not dependent on their salaries, will get the increased compensation, and will also be exempted from aiding in the defense of the city-at least such has been the practice heretofore. These things being known to the proscribed local troops (clerks, etc.), I repeat my doubts of their reliability at any critical moment. We have good news from the Rappahannock. It is said Gen. Rosser yesterday captured several hundred prisoners, 1200 beeves, 350 mules, wagons of stores, etc. etc. Nevertheless, there is some uneasiness felt in the city, there being nearly 12,000 prisoners here, and all the veteran troops of Gen. Elzey's division are being sent to North Carolina. February 8 The air is filled with rumors-none reliable. It is said Gen. Lee is much provoked at the alarm and excite. ment in the city, which thwarted a plan of his to capture the enemy on the Peninsula; and the militia and the Department Battalions
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 39 (search)
Seddon is sick, and Mr. Assistant Secretary Campbell is crabbed-Congress not having passed his Supreme Court bill. And if it were passed, the President would hardly appoint him judge. It is said one of our iron-clads is out — the rest to follow immediately. Let Butler beware! May 27 Clouds and sunshine; cooler. Nothing additional from the West. Several thousand Georgia mounted troops have arrived during the last 24 hours, in readiness to march to Lee. One Georgia regiment has 1200, and a South Carolina regiment that went up this morning 1000 men. Lee's army is at Ashland-17 miles distant. The enemy are marching down the Pamunky, north side. They will doubtless cross it, and march through New Kent and Charles City Counties to the James River, opposite Butler's army. Grant probably intends crossing his army to the south side, which, if effected, might lose us Richmond, for the city cannot subsist a week with its southern communications cut. We should starve. Bu
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 43 (search)
o the 11th of September, 1864: headquarters, army of Northern Virginia, September 19th, 1864. Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant and InspectorGen-eral for the information of the department. Attention is invited to the activity and skill of Col. Moseby, and-the intelligence and courage of the officers and men of his command, as displayed in this report. With the loss of little more than 20 men, he has killed, wounded, and captured, during the period embraced in this report, about 1200 of the enemy, and taken more than 1600 horses and mules, 230 beef cattle, and 85 wagons and ambulances, without counting many smaller operations. The services rendered by Col. Moseby and his command in watching and reporting the enemy's movements have also been of great value. His operations have been highly creditable to himself and his command. (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. Official: John Blair Hoge, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General. September 28 -Bright; subsequently cloudy
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 49 (search)
ension of the fate prepared for them on that occasion, and may have concerted a plan of escape. As well as I can learn from couriers, it appears that only some 1200 or 1500 of the enemy's cavalry advanced toward the city, and are now (10 A. M.) retiring-or driven back by our cavalry. But it is a little extraordinary that Gen. Lee, with almost unlimited power, has not been able to prevent 1200 Federals riding from Winchester to Richmond, over almost impracticable roads, without even a respectable skirmish wherein 1000 men were opposed to them. It is true Early was routed — but that was more than a week ago, and we have no particulars yet. The enemy's ved at the last days of the Confederacy. Mr. Wattles told me that the judge had been convinced, as far back as 1863,, that the cause was nearly hopeless. Some 1200 of Fitz Lee's cavalry passed through the city at 2 P. M. Gen. Longstreet has been ordered by Gen. Lee to attack Sheridan. He telegraphs back from north of the cit