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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 14 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 9 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1200 AD or search for 1200 AD in all documents.

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s in wounded 18,742. As nearly as can be determined at this time, the number of prisoners taken by our troops in the two battles will, at the lowest estimate, amount to 5000. The full returns will no doubt show a larger number. Of these about 1200 are wounded. This gives the rebel loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners, 25,542. It will be observed that this does not include their stragglers, the number of whom is said by citizens here to be large. It may be safely concluded, therefore,our wounded officers are Col. Eddy, Forty-eighth Indiana, Col. Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa, and Col. Boomer, Twenty-sixth Missouri. The loss of the enemy, according to the most carefully collected accounts, will number over one thousand two hundred (1200) in killed and wounded, while we have taken one thousand prisoners. Among the rebels killed were Gen. Little and Acting General Berry, beside many field-officers. Gen. Whitfield was mortally wounded in the early part of the engagement, but was re
men, it is not unreasonable to suppose that their loss was greater than ours. Estimating their killed at 500, the total rebel killed in the two battles would be 4000. According to the ratio of our own killed and wounded this would make their loss in wounded 18,742. As nearly as can be determined at this time, the number of prisoners taken by our troops in the two battles will, at the lowest estimate, amount to 5000. The full returns will no doubt show a larger number. Of these about 1200 are wounded. This gives the rebel loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners, 25,542. It will be observed that this does not include their stragglers, the number of whom is said by citizens here to be large. It may be safely concluded, therefore, that the rebel army lost at least 30,000 of their best troops during their campaign in Maryland. From the time our troops first encountered the enemy in Maryland until he was driven back into Virginia, we captured thirteen guns, seven caissons, n
the day. Our loss during the two hours battle, according to the reports received at the headquarters of Gen. Rosecrans, foots up at one hundred and forty-eight (148) killed, six hundred and twenty-five (625) wounded, and twenty (20) missing. Among our wounded officers are Col. Eddy, Forty-eighth Indiana, Col. Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa, and Col. Boomer, Twenty-sixth Missouri. The loss of the enemy, according to the most carefully collected accounts, will number over one thousand two hundred (1200) in killed and wounded, while we have taken one thousand prisoners. Among the rebels killed were Gen. Little and Acting General Berry, beside many field-officers. Gen. Whitfield was mortally wounded in the early part of the engagement, but was removed from the field by the enemy. Several of the officers present pronounced the battle one of the most sanguinary and fiercely contested battles of the war, for the number of men engaged, as during the most severe part of the battle not over thr