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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
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Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK VII., CHAPTER VI. (search)
rive in these parts, had omitted to take possession of the opposite side, which afforded such great resources of wealth, and chose the barren coast. We have continued our description to Byzantium, because this celebrated city,The ancient Byzantium, there are grounds for believing, was marked by the present walls of the Seraglio. The enlarged city was founded by the emperor Constantine, A. D. 328, who gave it his name, and made it the rival of Rome itself. It was taken from the Greeks in 1204, by the Venetians under Dandolo; retaken by the Greeks in 1261 under the emperor Michael Palæologus, and conquered by the Turks in 1453. The crescent found on some of the ancient Byzantine coins was adopted as a symbol by the Turks. by its proximity to the mouth of the Euxine Sea, forms a better-known and more remarkable termination of an account of the coast from the Danube than any other. Above Byzantium is the nation of the Asti, in whose territory is the city Calybe, which Philip the
mponents, only intended, it is probable, to baffle curiosity by telling just so much as everybody knew already. In 1098, the fleet of Alexis Comnenus used Greekfire against the Pisans. His ships had siphos fore and aft, in form of syringes, which squirted the inflamed matters. It is believed that the ancient Byzantium was marked by the present walls of the Seraglio. Con- stantine enlarged it A. D. 328, gave it its name, and made it the rival of Rome. It was taken from the Greeks, in 1204, by the Venetians under Dandolo; retaken by the Greeks, in 1261, under the Emperor Michael Palaeologus; captured by the Turks in 1453. An old recipe for Greek-fire is thus given: — Aspaltum, nepta, dragantum, pix quoque Graeca, Sulphur, vernicis, de perolio quoque vitro. Mercurii, sal gemmae Graeci dicitur ignis. Another reads as follows: Take of pulverized resin, sulphur, and pitch equal parts; one fourth of oppopanax and of pigeons' dung well dried, dissolved in turpentine water o
atue at Tarentum, referred to by Pliny, is represented with a key in one hand and a bowl in the other. The cup he is fabled to have received from Apollo, and in it he floated his polarized needle. The name of Hercules is given to the stone magnes. The needle is probably the arrow of Abaris. This supposition adds interest to this ancient classical symbol. In 1190, Guyot of Provence wrote a satirical poem, called La Bible, in which he refers to the use of the magnetic needle. Between 1204 and 1215, Jacobus of Vitry, Bishop of Ptolemais, referred to it in his description of Palestine, as follows:— The loadstone is found in India, to which, from some unknown cause, iron spontaneously attaches itself. When an iron needle is touched by the stone, it at once points towards the North Star; from whence it has become useful to those who navigate the seas. Latini of Florence, the preceptor of Dante, in a work published in Paris in 1260, entitled the Treasure, wrote thus:— Whe
oston,................................................... 297 Reynolds, General,................................................... 225 Reynolds, John P., Jr., 4, 8, 23, 24, 28, 43, 47, 49, 51, 116, 127, 135, 141. 145, 151, 192, 222, 258, 261, 264 Revere, Surgeon,...................................................... 89 Review, The Grand,................................................. 364 Rice, Edmund, 1, 2, 4, 7, 17, 20, 21, 36, 51, 59, 75, 96, 136, 140, 143, 151, 191, 198, 200, 1204, 208, 210, 213, 216, 231, 240, 242, 247, 248, 257, 261, 264, 284, 290, 295, 297, 300, 303, 308, 312, 322, 333, 344, 346, 351, 356, 357 Rice, George,...................................................... 331 Rice, James H.,..........................5, 7, 64, 104, 119, 151, 152, 192, 258 Rice, William F.,.......................223, 258, 271, 290, 333, 334, 343, 352 Richardson, Joseph,................................................... 330 Richardson, Major General,.........................
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
is arch at Rome, were transported by Constantine to ornament his new city, or whether they were originally of Chios, and, without having ever seen Athens or Rome, were brought in the fifth century, under Theodosius the younger, to Constantinople. It is a question that can never be decided, but it is a curious and interesting fact, that the young Dandolo, who has shown both learning and modesty in this controversy, is the direct lineal descendant of the blind old Doge of the same name, who in 1204 was the first to mount the breach at Constantinople, and, after having refused the Empire of the East, and placed Baldwin on the throne, brought these very horses as the trophy of his country's triumph. . . . . It is not a little singular that the father of this young man is the very man who, with fallen fortunes and proud blood, is appointed commander of the arsenal, and is obliged every day to visit the ruins of the glory his fathers founded. October 17.—At the Academy of Arts we enjoyed