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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 13, section 254 (search)
See Antiq. B. XIV. ch. 8. sect. 1; B. XV. ch. 7. sect. 9. Of the War, B. II. ch. 3. sect. 1; B. IV. ch. 4. sect. 5. This, in the opinion of Josephus, made them proselytes of justice, or entire Jews, as here and elsewhere, Antiq. B. XIV. ch. 8. sect. 1. However, Antigonus, the enemy of Herod, though Herod were derived from such a proselyte of justice for several generations, will allow him to be no more than a half Jew, B. XV. ch. 15. sect. 2. .But still, take out of Dean Prideaux, at the year 129, the words of Ammouius, a grammarian, which fully confirm this account of the Idumeans in Josephus: "The Jews," says he, are such by nature, and from the beginning, whilst the Idumeans were not Jews from the beginning, but Phoenicians and Syrians; but being afterward subdued by the Jews, and compelled to be circumcised, and to unite into one nation, and be subject to the same laws, they were called Jews." Dio also says, as the Dean there quotes him, from Book XXXVI. p. 37, "That country is ca
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Aelius Theodorus (search)
Ariste'ides, P. Aelius or Aelius Theodorus (*)Aristei/dhs), surnamed THEODORUS, one of the most celebrated Greek rhetoricians of the second century after Christ, was the son of Eudaemon, a priest of Zeus, and born at Adriani in Mysia, according to some in A. D. 129, and according to others in A. D. 117. He shewed extraordinary talents even in his early youth, and devoted himself with an almost unparalleled zeal to the study of rhetoric, which appeared to him the worthiest occupation of a man, and along with it he cultivated poetry as an amusement. Besides the rhetorician Herodes Atticus, whom he heard at Athens, he also received instructions from Aristocles at Pergamus, from Polemon at Smyrna, and from the grammarian Alexander of Cottyaeum. (Philostr. Vit. Sopsh. 2.9; Suidas, s. v. *)Aristei/dhs Aristeid. Orat. fun. in Alex. p. 80, ed. Jebb.) After being sufficiently prepared for his profession, he travelled for some time, and visited various places in Asia, Africa, especially Egypt,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
s Nepos, concerning the cause of Pomponius Rufus Varinus. Celsus was then praetor, and, as the leges annales were at that time religiously observed (Plin. Ep. 7.16), may be supposed to have been 34 years of age. This would give A. D. 67 for the year of the birth of Celsus, for the cause of Pomponius Rufus was pleaded when M. Acilius was consul-elect (Plin. Ep. 5.20), that is to say, in A. D. 101. Celsus was twice consul. The date of his first consulship is not recorded. The second occurred A. D. 129, when he had C. Neratius Marcellus for his colleague. (Dig. 5. tit. 3. s. 20.6.) He was a friend of Hadrian, and one of that emperor's council (Spartian. Hadrian. 100.18, where for Julius Celsus is to be read Juventius Celsus), and he probably died towards the end of Hadrian's reign, for Julianus, the jurist, in a fragment of a work (Digesta) which was written in the commencement of the reign of Antoninus Pius (compare Dig. 3. tit. 5. s. 6.12; 4. tit. 2. s. 18), speaks of Celsus in the pas
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
on eponymus. From Athens he returned to Rome by way of Sicily, either in A. D. 126 or 127. He was saluted at Rome as pater patriae, and his wife distinguished by the title of Augusta. The next few years he remained at Rome, with only one interruption, during which lie visited Africa. He seems to have chiefly employed his time at Rome in endeavouring to introduce the Greek institutions and modes of worship, for which he had conceived a great admiration at Athens. It seems to have been about A. D. 129 that Hadrian set out on his second journey to the east. He travelled by way of Athens, where he stayed for some time to see the completion of the numerous buildings which he had commenced during his previous visit, especially to dedicate the temple of the Olympian Zeus, and an altar to himself. In Asia he conciliated the various princes in the most amicable and liberal manner, so that those who did not accept his invitation had afterwards themselves most reason to regret it. He sent back t
ythagorean, and Theon the Ptolemaist. THEON of Smyrna The date of " Theon of Smyrna the philosopher," to quote in full the account which Suidas gives of him, depends upon the assumption (which there seems no reason to dispute) that he is the Theon whom Ptolemy and the younger Theon mention as having made astronomical observations in the time of Hadrian. Theon of Smyrna certainly wrote on astronomy. On the assumption just made, Ptolemy has preserved his observations of Mercury and Venus (A. D. 129-133). Bouillaud supposes that it is Theon of Smyrna to whom Proclus alludes as having written on the genealogies of Solon and Plato, and Plutarch as having written on the lunar spots. (See Bouillaud's preface, or the quotations in Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. iv. p. 35.) Works *Tw=n kata\ maqhmatikh\n xrhsi/mwn ei)s th\n tou= *Pla/twnos a)na/gnwsin All that we have left is a portion of a work entitled, *Tw=n kata\ maqhmatikh\n xrhsi/mwn ei)s th\n tou= *Pla/twnos a)na/gnwsin. The portion
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
THEON of Smyrna The date of " Theon of Smyrna the philosopher," to quote in full the account which Suidas gives of him, depends upon the assumption (which there seems no reason to dispute) that he is the Theon whom Ptolemy and the younger Theon mention as having made astronomical observations in the time of Hadrian. Theon of Smyrna certainly wrote on astronomy. On the assumption just made, Ptolemy has preserved his observations of Mercury and Venus (A. D. 129-133). Bouillaud supposes that it is Theon of Smyrna to whom Proclus alludes as having written on the genealogies of Solon and Plato, and Plutarch as having written on the lunar spots. (See Bouillaud's preface, or the quotations in Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. iv. p. 35.) Works *Tw=n kata\ maqhmatikh\n xrhsi/mwn ei)s th\n tou= *Pla/twnos a)na/gnwsin All that we have left is a portion of a work entitled, *Tw=n kata\ maqhmatikh\n xrhsi/mwn ei)s th\n tou= *Pla/twnos a)na/gnwsin. The portion which now exists is in two books, one on