hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.) 16 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 11 11 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 2 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. You can also browse the collection for 1300 AD or search for 1300 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, TABULARIUM (search)
ium . de . s . s . faciundum . coeravit . eidemque . probavit; and the other still partially preserved in one of the rooms of the building (CIL i². 736 =vi. 1133=31597): Q . Lu]tatius . Q . f . Q . n . C[atulus . cos . de . s]en . sent . faciundu[m . coeravit.] eidemque . prob[avit]. The second story seems to have been added, or at least rebuilt, about the end of the first century (see below), but nothing else is known of the history of the building until the reign of Boniface VIII (about 1300 A.D.), when the present tower at the north end was erected. Later, Michelangelo destroyed the entire upper and western part, and built the present Palazzo del Senatore directly upon the ancient structure (LS ii. 70). This building, trapezoidal in shape, occupied all the space between the clivus Capitolinus on the south-west and the flight of steps (gradus Monetae ?) which led up past the carcer to the arx on the north-east. On the forum side the foundation wall began on the level of the area Vo