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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 134 AD or search for 134 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
nd most of their conjectures refer to too late a period, unless Celsus the father attained to an unusual age. Thus Wieling (Jurisprudentia Restituta, p. 351) and Guil. Grotius (De Vitis Jurisp. 2.2.2) make Ducenus the same as L. Cejonius Commodus Verus, who was consul A. D. 106. Others are for L. Annius Verus, consul A. D. 121. Ant. Augustinus (De Nominibus Propriis Pandectarum, 100.3, p. 259, n. [g.]) seems to think he might have been the Juventius Verus, who was consul for the third time A. D. 134. Heineccins (Hist. Jur 104.241, n.) is for Decennius Geminus who was consul suffectus A. D. 57, and whose cognomen might have been Verus. It was in the council of Ducenus Verus that the opinion of Celsus the father was given upon an important point, and was adopted as law. He held (to use the nomenclature of English jurisprudence), that the beneficial interest in a legacy did not lapse by the death of the trustee before the testator. (As to the consilium of the consul and other magistrate
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
ds became reconciled to Hadrian, and appears to have lived on good terms with him during the reign of Trajan. By this emperor lie was twice raised to the consulship, as we see from inscriptions, once in A. D. 107, and again in 111. It was also during the reign of Trajan that he married his daughter to Fuscus Salinator, on which occasion Pliny wrote him a letter of congratulation. (Plin. Ep. 6.26.) Hadrian, on his accession in A. D. 117, appeared to have quite forgotten and forgiven the former enmity of Servianus, for lie treated him with distinguished honour, raised him to the consulship for the third time in A. D. 134, and gave him hopes of succeeding to the empire. But when he resolved to appoint L. Commodus Verus his successor, and made him Caesar in A. D. 136, he put Servianus and his grandson Fuscus to death, fearing that they might aspire to the throne. Servianus was then in his ninetieth year. (Spart. Hadr. 1, 2, 8, 15, 23, 25 ; Plin. Ep. 3.17, 6.26 D. C. 59.2, 17, comp. 76.7.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Varus, C. Vi'bius whose name occurs only on coins, a specimen of which is annexed. On the obverse is the head of M. Antonius, and on the reverse Venus holding a figure of Victory in one hand and a cornucopia in the other. This Varus must have been triumvir of the mint or have held some magistracy after the death of Julius Caesar and the commencement of the triumvirate, as is shown by the beard of M. Antonius, which he allowed to grow at the beginning of the triumvirate. (Eckhel, vol. v. p. 342.) The name of Vibius Varus occurs in the reign of Hadrian : there was a C. Vibius Juventius Varus, who was consul in A. D. 134.